Monday, September 30, 2013

Holidays for September 30th 2013

Chewing Gum Day


September 30th is a lip-smacking fun holiday. It's Chewing Gum Day.

While the origins of this annual “holiday” are unknown, folks have been chewing, chomping, smacking, blowing and popping gum for ages (and annoying teachers for just about as long!) Thomas Adams received a patent on the first gum-making machine in 1871. After experimenting with different flavors, he manufactured the first flavored gum in the United States, Adams’ Black Jack, a licorice-flavored gum. It was also the first gum available in stick form. Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit and Spearmint gum soon followed. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Whether you prefer that tutti-fruity flavor, super-duper bubble or minty fresh taste, today’s gum comes in all sorts of shapes, colors and fun flavors. And besides tasting yummy, sugar-free gum can help fight cavities, too. And some believe chewing sugar-free gum is good for your waistline too! According to researchers from the Mayo Clinic, gum chewers can lose about 11 pounds of weight annually! Nicotine gum is also used to help people kick the habit. Just in case you don’t know how to chew gum, you’re in luck!

Happy Chewing Gum Day! Just remember to spit your gum out before you go to class and don't swallow it!
Fiscal Forecast Day


Many companies close out the fiscal year annually on September 30th, totaling assets and liabilities and mapping our profits and losses. For other organizations, September 30th marks the end of the third quarter of the fiscal year.

Either way, September 30th has become known as Fiscal Forecast Day, a prime occasion for calculating risks, weighing investment options, considering strategic purchases and evaluating financial holdings.


National Hot Mulled Cider Day


Today is National Hot Mulled Cider Day! Hot mulled cider is a delicious drink perfectly suited for crisp September afternoons. Apple cider is produced using a cider press and is a time-honored favorite of the autumn season.

To make mulled cider, slowly add brown sugar to apple cider in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir until all the sugar has dissolved. Add other ingredients such as nutmeg, allspice, orange juice, and lemon juice, and bring to a boil. Strain out the spices, pour into a mug, and add a cinnamon stick.

Enjoy National Hot Mulled Cider Day as you sip on your homemade brew!
National Mud Pack Day


This holiday is for learning and appreciating the use of mud on the face or really any part of the body. Mud packs have been popular for years for facial treatments to keep the skin young, soft and supple. So let today be the day you learn how to nourish your skin with mud.

Mainly women but mud can be used by both men and women. Many people celebrate mud pack activity all throughout the year and not just on September 30th.

Peloid is mud used therapeutically. Peloids consist of humus and minerals formed over many years by geological and biological, chemical and physical processes.

Numerous peloids are available today, of which the most popular are peat pulps, lake mud, sea mud and plant substances. Peloid procedures are also various; the most common of them are peloid wraps, peloid baths, and peloid packs applied locally to the part of the body, which is being treated.

Peloid packs and, specifically, peat, have been used in Europe for medicinal baths and wraps for the past 200 years.

Peloid treatments have been used for rheumatic disorders, osteoarthritis, gynecological disorders, sciatica, skin diseases, trauma and many more various afflictions and ailments.

Peloids are widely used in cosmetology. They are applied as face masks. Applying peloid masks once a week helps to revitalize the skin, tighten it and bind fluids in the skin layers. Regular use of peloids cause wrinkles to disappear and prevents new wrinkles from appearing. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Blasphemy Day


Blasphemy Rights Day International is a holiday in which individuals and groups are encouraged to openly express their criticism of, or even disdain for, religion. It was founded in 2009 by the Center for Inquiry. A student contacted the Center for Inquiry in Amherst, New York to present the idea, which CFI put its support behind. Ronald Lindsay, president and CEO of the Center for Inquiry said regarding Blasphemy Day, "We think religious beliefs should be subject to examination and criticism just as political beliefs are, but we have a taboo on religion," in an interview with CNN. The day was set on September 30, to coincide with the anniversary of the publication of satirical drawings of Muhammad in one of Denmark's newspapers, resulting in the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy.

According to USA Today's interview with Justin Trottier, a Toronto coordinator of Blasphemy Day, "We're not seeking to offend, but if in the course of dialogue and debate, people become offended, that's not an issue for us. There is no human right not to be offended."

Events worldwide on the first annual Blasphemy Day in 2009 included an art exhibit in Washington, DC and a free speech festival in Los Angeles. Blasphemy Day was also widely discussed across the web and covered by several media outlets.

Anti-blasphemy laws exist throughout the world. In many parts of Europe and North America they have been overturned, although there are anti-blasphemy laws in Austria,Denmark, Finland, Greece, Italy, Liechtenstein, Iceland, San Marino and the UK. (The UK common law offences of blasphemy and blasphemous libel were abolished by theCriminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008, section 79. The remaining law, Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2006, concerns inciting hatred against a person on the grounds of their religion.) There are also "religious insult" laws in 21 European nations. The Republic of Ireland passed the "Defamation Act 2009" in that year, which states in part, "A person who publishes or utters blasphemous matter shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable upon conviction on indictment to a fine not exceeding €25,000."

Finland has been the setting for a number of noteworthy blasphemy trials in the 2000s. The Finnish linguist, political blogger Helsinki City Councillor and subsequent member of parliament Jussi Halla-aho was charged with "disturbing religious worship" because of internet posts in which he called Muhammad a pedophile, Halla-aho was fined €330. In some countries, blasphemy is punishable by death, such as in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. Six US states (Massachusetts, Michigan, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Wyoming) still have anti-blasphemy laws on their books, although they are seldom enforced.

Blasphemy Day is celebrated on September 30 to coincide with the anniversary of the publication of satirical drawings of Muhammad in one of Denmark's newspapers, resulting in the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. Although the caricatures of Muhammad caused some controversy within Denmark, especially among Muslims, it became a widespread furor after Muslim imams in several countries stirred up violent protests in which at least 137 people were killed, embassies burned and other acts of recrimination carried out because of the blasphemy.