Sunday, March 2, 2014

Holidays and Observances for March 2 2014

NEA's Read Across America Day (Dr. Seuss's Birthday)


NEA's Read Across America is an annual reading motivation and awareness program that calls for every child in every community to celebrate reading on March 2, the birthday of beloved children's author Dr. Seuss.

NEA's Read Across America also provides NEA members, parents, caregivers, and children the resources and activities they need to keep reading on the calendar 365 days a year.

In cities and towns across the nation, teachers, teenagers, librarians, politicians, actors, athletes, parents, grandparents, and others develop NEA's Read Across America activities to bring reading excitement to children of all ages. Governors, mayors, and other elected officials recognize the role reading plays in their communities with proclamations and floor statements. Athletes and actors issue reading challenges to young readers. And teachers and principals seem to be more than happy to dye their hair green or be duct-taped to a wall if it boosts their students' reading.

The Beginning
In May 1997, a small reading task force at NEA came up with a big idea. "Let's create a day to celebrate reading," the group decided. "We hold pep rallies to get kids excited about football. We assemble to remember that Character Counts. Why don't we do something to get kids excited about reading? We'll call it 'NEA's Read Across America' and we'll celebrate it on Dr. Seuss's birthday." And so was born on March 2, 1998, the largest celebration of reading this country has ever seen.

The Purpose of Read Across America
Motivating children to read is an important factor in student achievement and creating lifelong successful readers. Research has shown that children who are motivated and spend more time reading do better in school.

Namesake Day


Namesake Day is a holiday for learning about the story of how you got your given name and the origin of your surname. Were you named after your parent? Perhaps, one of your aunts or uncles or a friend of the family? Maybe someone famous, or just a name that your parents liked? If you don't know already, today's the day to find out. Use the Internet to research the origin, or the significance, of your last name. Celebrate by having a party with people who have the same name as you.

Namesake is a term used to characterize a person, place, thing, quality, action, state, or idea that has the same, or a similar, name to another - especially (but not exclusively) if the person or thing is actually named after, rather than merely sharing the name of another.

For example, if a person, place, or thing has the same name as another - especially if they are named after another person, place, or thing, then the name target is said to be the namesake of the name source. The earliest use reported in the Oxford English Dictionary was in 1635. Dictionaries suggest that the word probably comes from "name's sake", "for one's name('s) sake", for "name sake".

You can learn what your name means at www.behindthename.com

National Banana Cream Pie Day


It’s National Banana Cream Pie Day! People have been making pies filled with cream, pudding, and custard since the Medieval times. Similar inventions from that era include Napoleons, cream puffs, and ├ęclairs.

Bananas arrived in the United States in the 1880s. By the early 1900s, banana recipes appeared in every major cookbook across the country. Traditional banana cream pie recipes call for a crust made out of graham crackers or pastry dough; a layer of sliced bananas; a custard filling made with eggs, milk, sugar, and vanilla; and a topping of whipped cream or meringue. Common embellishments include pecans or drizzles of chocolate and caramel.

Celebrate National Banana Cream Pie Day with a big slice of banana cream pie from your favorite local bakery!