Sunday, March 23, 2014

Holidays and Observances for March 23 2014

National Chip and Dip Day


It’s National Chip and Dip Day! Chips and dip are the iconic American party snack. Whether you prefer tortilla chips, potato chips, or corn chips, there are dozens of dips to complement your snack of choice.

Humans have been dipping their food into sweet and savory sauces for centuries. Some of the earliest dips were hummus and olive oil, which originated in the Mediterranean region and are still very popular today. Salsas and dips made with sour cream became popular in the United States in the 1940s. After the Great Depression, many middle class families found themselves without a maid for the first time. Chips and dip became the go-to party dish because it was so simple to prepare.

To celebrate National Chip and Dip Day, invite some friends over for a potluck-style chip and dip party!

National Melba Toast Day


Melba toast is a dry, crisp and thinly sliced toast, often served with soup and salad or topped with either melted cheese or pâté. It is named after Dame Nellie Melba, the stage name of Australian opera singer Helen Porter Mitchell. Its name is thought to date from 1897, when the singer was very ill and it became a staple of her diet. The toast was created for her by chef and fan Auguste Escoffier, who also created the Peach Melba dessert for her. The hotel proprietor César Ritz supposedly named it in a conversation with Escoffier.

Melba toast is made by lightly toasting slices of bread under a grill, on both sides. The resulting toast is then sliced laterally. The thin slices are then returned to the grill with the untoasted sides towards the heat source, resulting in toast half the normal thickness. Thus, it can be described as a twice-baked food (see under rusk).

Melba toast is also available commercially, and was at one time given to infants who were teething as a hard food substance on which to chew.

In 1925, the Mayo Brothers prescribed the "Eighteen Day Reducing Diet" to Ethel Barrymore. It included Melba toast, which made the toast very popular at the time. Melba toast can also be used to make stuffing or dressing.

Near Miss Day


Near Miss Day takes place on March 23. It commemorates the day a huge Asteroid nearly missed hitting the earth on March 23, 1989. The 300-meter (1,000-foot) diameter asteroid missed the Earth by 700,000 kilometers (430,000 mi) passing through the exact position where the Earth was only 6 hours before. If the asteroid had impacted it would have created the largest explosion in recorded history, 12 times as powerful as the Tsar Bomba, the most powerful nuclear bomb ever exploded. It attracted widespread attention as early calculations had its passage being as close as 64,000 km (40,000 mi) from the Earth, with large uncertainties that allowed for the possibility of it striking the Earth.

OK Day


The word OK started as a joke. A journalist for the "The Boston Morning Post" purposefully used and abbreviation of a misspelled phrase, "all korrect," according to Dennis Baron of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The word first appeared in print on March 23, 1839. "Most of the 'abracadabraisms' popular among journalists in 1839 are long gone, but OK stuck around."

Barron equates the popularity of OK with common abbreviations of today including BTW and OMG, both of which appeared in print well before Yahoo! Messenger was created. In 1917, J. A. F. Fisher wrote, "I hear that a new order of Knighthood is on the tapis-O.M.G. (Oh! My God!)-Shower it on the Admiralty!" 

World Meteorological Day


World Meteorological Day is celebrated every year on 23 March to commemorate the entry into force in 1950 of the convention that created the World Meteorological Organization. The day also highlights the huge contribution that National Meteorological and Hydrological Services make to the safety and well-being of society.

This year's World Meteorological Day theme is “Weather and climate: engaging youth." Today’s youth will benefit from the dramatic advances being made in our ability to understand and forecast the Earth’s weather and climate. At the same time, most of them will live into the second half of this century and experience the increasing impacts of global warming. WMO encourages young people to learn more about our weather and climate system and to contribute to action on climate change.