Monday, March 24, 2014

Holidays and Observances for March 24 2014

National Chocolate Covered Raisins Day


It's National Chocolate-Covered Raisin Day! Did you know that Nestlé Raisinets are one of the most popular candies for movie-goers? People can’t get enough of the delicious fruit and dark chocolate combination!

Culinary historians believe that humans first discovered raisins when they came across grapes drying on a vine. These sundried morsels soon became one of the most popular food sweeteners, second only to honey. Raisins are an excellent source fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, and certain B vitamins. Add some dark chocolate into the mix and you’ll also get a healthy dose of antioxidants and important minerals.

Enjoy a handful of chocolate-covered raisins today in honor of National Chocolate-Covered Raisin Day!

World Tuberculosis Day


On March 24, 1882, Dr. Robert Koch announced the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB). During this time, TB killed one out of every seven people living in the United States and Europe. Dr. Koch’s discovery was the most important step taken toward the control and elimination of this deadly disease.

In 1982, a century after Dr. Koch's announcement, the first World TB Day was sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD). The event was intended to educate the public about the devastating health and economic consequences of TB, its effect on developing countries, and its continued tragic impact on global health.

Today, World TB Day is commemorated across the globe with activities as diverse as the locations in which they are held. But more can be done to raise awareness about the effects of TB. Among infectious diseases, TB remains the second leading killer of adults in the world, with 1.5 million TB-related deaths in 2010.

Until TB is controlled, World TB Day won’t be a celebration. But it is a valuable opportunity to educate the public about the devastation TB can spread and how it can be stopped.

Each year, we recognize World TB Day on March 24, often with a variety of activities leading up to the official day. This annual event commemorates the date in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes tuberculosis (TB).

World TB Day provides the opportunity to raise awareness about TB-related problems and solutions and to support worldwide TB-control efforts. While great strides have been made to control and cure TB, people still get sick and die from this disease in our country. Much more needs to be done to eliminate this disease.

This year CDC selected the theme "Find TB. Treat TB. Working together to eliminate TB." to highlight that TB is still a life-threatening problem in the United States, despite the declining number of TB cases. Anyone can get TB, and our current efforts to find and treat latent TB infection and TB disease are not sufficient. Misdiagnosis of TB still exists and health care professionals often do not "think TB."

This World TB Day, we call for further collaboration to find and treat TB. By working together to raise awareness that TB still exists and sharing the personal stories of those people affected by TB, we can bring attention to this public health problem.

This year’s World TB Day theme encourages local and state TB programs to reach out to their communities to raise awareness about TB. We don’t have to fight TB alone; we should partner with others who are also caring for those most at risk for TB such as people with HIV infection or diabetes, and the homeless. Everyone has a role in ensuring that one day TB will be eliminated. CDC and our partners are committed to a world free of TB.

Call for a World Free of TB
The fight to eliminate TB will only be successful if local, state, national, and international partners from all sectors of our society join resources and collaborate to find solutions.

Our united effort is needed to reach those at highest risk for TB and to identify and implement innovative strategies to improve testing and treatment among high-risk populations.

CDC and its domestic and international partners, including the National TB Controllers Association, Stop TB USA, and the global Stop TB Partnership are taking many steps to stop further spread of TB and to reduce the overall burden of the disease. Efforts range from developing new treatment regimens and increasing the capacity of health professionals to provide adequate treatment, to issuing new recommendations for improved testing and treatment for U.S. immigrants.

International Day for the Right to the Truth Concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for Dignity of Victims


On 21 December 2010, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 24 March as the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims.

The purpose of the Day is to:
  • Honor the memory of victims of gross and systematic human rights violations and promote the importance of the right to truth and justice;
  • Pay tribute to those who have devoted their lives to, and lost their lives in, the struggle to promote and protect human rights for all;
  • Recognize, in particular, the important work and values of Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, of El Salvador, who was assassinated on 24 March 1980, after denouncing violations of the human rights of the most vulnerable populations and defending the principles of protecting lives, promoting human dignity and opposition to all forms of violence.
The UN General Assembly, in its resolution, invites all Member States, international organizations and civil society organizations and individuals, to observe the International Day in an appropriate manner.

In a study conducted in 2006 the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights concluded that the right to the truth about gross human rights violations and serious violations of human rights law is an inalienable and autonomous right, linked to the duty and obligation of the State to protect and guarantee human rights, to conduct effective investigations and to guarantee effective remedy and reparations.

The study affirms that the right to the truth implies knowing the full and complete truth as to the events that transpired, their specific circumstances, and who participated in them, including knowing the circumstances in which the violations took place, as well as the reasons for them.

In a 2009 report on the Right to the Truth, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights identified best practices for the effective implementation of this right, in particular practices relating to archives and records concerning gross violations of human rights, and programs on the protection of witnesses and other persons involved in trials connected with such violations.

The Commission on the Truth for El Salvador was established in accordance with the Mexico Agreements of 27 April 1991 to investigate serious acts of violence that had occurred since 1980 and whose impact on society was deemed to require an urgent public knowledge of the truth.  In its report of 15 March 1993, the Commission documented the facts of the assassination of Archbishop Oscar ArnulfoRomero by pro-government forces, the so-called "death squads".  He was shot dead by an assassin as he celebrated mass on 24 March 1980.