Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Holidays and Observances for July 9 2014

National Don't Put All Your Eggs in One Omelet Day


On the 9th day of every July falls a little known food holiday known as National Don't Put all your Eggs in One Omelet Day. This is a day for those who enjoy omelets or all types and also have a mind for prudence and conservation to share both of these loves with the world, and spread awareness of this breakfast staple as well as importance of not wasting food and making your groceries last. National Don't Put all your Eggs in One Omelet Day can be a fun day on which to cook this savory breakfast staple as well as a day to learn a simple life lesson.

It is difficult to track down the exact origins of National Don't Put all your Eggs in One Omelet Day, or even pinpoint the exact reason for its existence. Is this a celebration of the omelet? Is it a literal lesson in conservation? This is apparently open to interpretation, as little documentation on this holiday exists.

You may be hard pressed to find any widespread, major celebration of National Don't Put all your Eggs in One Omelet Day. Of course, there is always the chance that local diners or other types of restaurants with omelets on the menu will be offering special creations or reduced prices in honor of the day.

The most obvious way to celebrate National Don't Put all your Eggs in One Omelet Day is, naturally, to make an omelet without using all of the eggs in your refrigerator. Those with children can use this day as an opportunity to teach their young ones how to make an omelet, and also offer advice on conservation and practical living.

National Sugar Cookie Day


Each year on the 9th day of July in the United States, there falls a little known holiday called National Sugar Cookie Day. This is one holiday that people of all ages will enjoy celebrating, as all that a proper celebration requires is the devouring of a sweet sugar cookie of any variety.

Of course, eating sugar cookies is not the only way to celebrate this special occasion. One of the reasons sugar cookies are popular is that they are "blank canvasses," and may be decorated in any way you desire. National Sugar Cookie Day provides an opportunity to spend time with family or friends baking cookies and then embellishing them with frosting, sprinkles, candy or whatever else you like.

It is difficult to track down any official information on the origins of National Sugar Cookie Day, as most references come from food websites, blogs or other casual sources. Often, food holidays are started by someone with close ties to the product, either as a manufacturer or a connoisseur.

Sugar cookies themselves, however, have a lengthy historical background. The origins of cookies date back to the 7th century in Persia, along with the cultivation of sugar. Sugar cookies as most of us know them began with the Nazareth or Amish sugar cookie, created by settlers from Germany in the Nazareth area of Pennsylvania.

You may choose to celebrate National Sugar Cookie Day by simply biting into a cookie at home, or you may wish to throw a sugar cookie party with friends or family members. You can make the dough and bake them in the oven, and then have fun adding color, texture and flavor with various decorations.