Friday, September 5, 2014

Holidays and Observances for September 5 2014

National Be Late For Something Day


September 5 is National Be Late for Something Day.

In psychology, procrastination refers to the act of replacing high-priority actions with tasks of lower priority, or doing something from which one derives enjoyment, and thus putting off important tasks to a later time. In accordance with Freud, the Pleasure principle may be responsible for procrastination; humans do not prefer negative emotions, and handing off a stressful task until a further date is enjoyable. The concept that humans work best under pressure provides additional enjoyment and motivation to postponing a task. Some psychologists cite such behavior as a mechanism for coping with the anxiety associated with starting or completing any task or decision. Other psychologists indicate that anxiety is just as likely to get people to start working early as late and the focus should be impulsiveness. That is, anxiety will cause people to delay only if they are impulsive.

Schraw, Wadkins, and Olafson have proposed three criteria for a behavior to be classified as procrastination: it must be counterproductive, needless, and delaying. Similarly, Steel (2007) reviews all previous attempts to define procrastination, indicating it is “to voluntarily delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse off for the delay.”

Procrastination may result in stress, a sense of guilt and crisis, severe loss of personal productivity, as well as social disapproval for not meeting responsibilities or commitments. These feelings combined may promote further procrastination. While it is regarded as normal for people to procrastinate to some degree, it becomes a problem when it impedes normal functioning. Chronic procrastination may be a sign of an underlying psychological disorder. Such procrastinators may have difficulty seeking support due to social stigma and the belief that task-aversion is caused by laziness, low willpower or low ambition.

If being late is something you already do on a regular basis because you fall behind schedule, or don’t have a schedule at all, then today is just like any other day but with a twist- it’s a holiday, so nobody can be mad at you!

However, if you enjoy being on time or even early, you might find it a little difficult to participate. Give it a shot, think of it as a chance to take it easy and relax, even if it’s just for 5 minutes. Parties don’t count though; being “fashionably late” is not included in this holiday.

National Be Late for Something Day might also come in handy for those of you who do not want to be late for anything. If you got all the red lights on your way to work, forgot something at home and had to turn around, blame it on National Be Late for Something Day and act like you meant to be late.

National Cheese Pizza Day


Today is National Cheese Pizza Day! Did you know that Americans eat approximately 350 slices of pizza per second? Whether you prefer thin crust, deep dish, or regular style, today's the day to celebrate one of the most popular meals in the country.

Although voracious aficionados can suck down several sauce-laden slices in mere minutes, pizza didn't develop in a vacuum—an Italian political vacuum, that is.

Founded around 600 B.C. as a Greek settlement, Naples in the 1700's and early 1800's was a thriving waterfront city. Technically an independent kingdom, it was notorious for its throngs of working poor, or lazzaroni. “The closer you got to the bay, the more dense their population, and much of their living was done outdoors, sometimes in homes that were little more than a room,” said Carol Helstosky, author of “Pizza: A Global History” and associate professor of history at the University of Denver.

Unlike the wealthy minority, these Neapolitans required inexpensive food that could be consumed quickly. Pizza—flatbreads with various toppings, eaten for any meal and sold by street vendors or informal restaurants—met this need. “Judgmental Italian authors often called their eating habits ‘disgusting,’” Helstosky noted. These early pizzas consumed by Naples’ poor featured the tasty garnishes beloved today, such as tomatoes, cheese, oil, anchovies and garlic.

Italy unified in 1861, and King Umberto I and Queen Margherita visited Naples in 1889. Legend has it that the traveling pair became bored with their steady diet of French haute cuisine and asked for an assortment of pizzas from the city’s Pizzeria Brandi, the successor to Da Pietro pizzeria, founded in 1760. The variety the queen enjoyed most was called pizza mozzarella, a pie topped with the soft white cheese, red tomatoes and green basil. (Perhaps it was no coincidence that her favorite pie featured the colors of the Italian flag.) From then on, the story goes, that particular topping combination was dubbed pizza Margherita.

Queen Margherita’s blessing could have been the start of an Italy-wide pizza craze. After all, flatbreads with toppings weren’t unique to the lazzaroni or their time—they were consumed, for instance, by the ancient Egyptians, Romans and Greeks. (The latter ate a version with herbs and oil, similar to today’s focaccia.) And yet, until the 1940s, pizza would remain little known in Italy beyond Naples’ borders.

An ocean away, though, immigrants to the United States from Naples were replicating their trusty, crusty pizzas in New York and other American cities, including Trenton, New Haven, Boston, Chicago and St. Louis. The Neapolitans were coming for factory jobs, as did millions of Europeans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; they weren’t seeking to make a culinary statement. But relatively quickly, the flavors and aromas of pizza began to intrigue non-Neapolitans and non-Italians.

The first documented United States pizzeria was G. (for Gennaro) Lombardi’s on Spring Street in Manhattan, licensed to sell pizza in 1905. (Prior to that, the dish was homemade or purveyed by unlicensed vendors.) Lombardi’s, still in operation today though no longer at its 1905 location, “has the same oven as it did originally,” noted food critic John Mariani, author of “How Italian Food Conquered the World.”

Debates over the finest slice in town can be heated, as any pizza fan knows. But Mariani credited three East Coast pizzerias with continuing to churn out pies in the century-old tradition: Totonno’s (Coney Island, Brooklyn, opened 1924); Mario’s (Arthur Avenue, the Bronx, opened 1919); and Pepe’s (New Haven, opened 1925).

As Italian-Americans, and their food, migrated from city to suburb, east to west, especially after World War II, pizza’s popularity in the United States boomed. No longer seen as an “ethnic” treat, it was increasingly identified as a fast, fun food. Regional, decidedly non-Neapolitan variations emerged, eventually including California-gourmet pizzas topped with anything from barbecued chicken to smoked salmon.

Postwar pizza finally reached Italy and beyond. “Like blue jeans and rock and roll, the rest of the world, including the Italians, picked up on pizza just because it was American,” explained Mariani. Reflecting local tastes, toppings can run the gamut from Gouda cheese in CuraƧao to hardboiled eggs in Brazil. Yet international outposts of American chains like Domino’s and Pizza Hut also thrive in about 60 different countries. Helstosky thinks one of the quirkiest American pizza variations is the Rocky Mountain pie, baked with a supersized, doughy crust to save for last. “Then you dip it in honey and have it for dessert,” she said.

The world of pizza has certainly expanded way beyond Margherita-ville.

National Lazy Mom's Day


Yes, that’s right—today, September 7, is National Lazy Mom’s Day—the day when all moms everywhere should make an effort to relax… and feel good about it!

Not that you need a silly national holiday to take some time for yourself, but we all know—it’s never easy. So today, in celebration of America’s greatest holiday (grossly under-recognized, in our opinion!) we've pulled together 25 easy relaxation ideas for moms.
  1. Take a nice long soak in a hot bath. Classic, we know. But it works every time!
  2. Light an aromatic candle, and breathe… You know what they say— focusing on the breath is the key to relaxation.
  3. Enjoy a cup of hot tea.
  4. Get cozy in a warm blanket.
  5. Read a book. Believe it or not, British researchers found that reading a good book works even better and faster than other methods to calm your nerves, such as listening to music, going for a walk or settling down with a cup of tea.
  6. Take a power nap.
  7. Put on some tunes.
  8. Meditate.
  9. Give yourself a massage.
  10. Write in your journal.
  11. Take a walk by yourself to think and breathe.
  12. Act like a kid. Don’t worry about what others might think; just allow yourself to be silly for a little bit. Do what you enjoyed doing as a child—spin a hoola hoop, build a sand castle, play a game or just dance.
  13. Close your eyes in the middle of the day—do nothing for two minutes.
  14. Watch a funny movie or your favorite show.
  15. Take the dog for her morning walk. Studies show that just 10 minutes of physical activity three times a day can noticeably improve your mood.
  16. Call a friend who makes you laugh.
  17. Daydream a little. The Well Mom recommends to “picture yourself in an elevator, happily sandwiched between two hot actors of your choice.”
  18. Sip on a glass of your favorite wine…
  19. Or whip up a yummy fall-themed cocktail to help you unwind.
  20. Snuggle with your pet.
  21. Do some fantasy online shopping.
  22. Catch up with friends on Facebook, or better yet, in person over lunch.
  23. Get a pedicure!
  24. Indulge in a few quiet minutes of scrapbooking.
  25. Have sex with your spouse. Like Elises put it, “It’s the best way to stay fit, be healthy, and live happily.” 
National Shrink Day


Did you know that today is National Shrink Day?

Celebrate all psychiatrists and psychologists on the birthday of America’s favorite TV shrink, Bob Newhart.

Newhart was born on September 5, 1929, at Chicago, Illinois.

What’s Bob Newhart’s philosophy of life? “All I can say about life is, Oh God, enjoy it!”

The comedian who made the one-sided telephone conversation into a comedic art form turns 80 today. His deadpan delivery was popular enough to win him his own TV shows, The Bob Newhart Show (1972-78) and Newhart (1982-90).

In the final episode of the latter show, Bob wakes up in bed with his first TV wife, Suzanne Pleshette, and he realizes that the entire second series was a dream. (Not bad!)

In 2007, Newhart’s Grammy Award-winning recording, The Button Down Mind of Bob Newhart, was inducted into the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry.
‘I don’t like country music, but I don’t mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means ‘put down.’  -  Bob Newhart  

What's the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist?

That may sound like a setup for a knee-slapper, but it's actually a good question, and many people don't know the full answer.

It's not as simple as who tends to what, like the difference between a goatherd and shepherd. Both kinds of professionals treat people with problems that vary widely by degree and type, from mild anxiety to schizophrenia. Both can practice psychotherapy, and both can do research.

The short answer is, psychiatrists are medical doctors and psychologists are not. The suffix "-iatry" means "medical treatment," and "-logy" means "science" or "theory." So psychiatry is the medical treatment of the psyche, and psychology is the science of the psyche.

Bring Your Manners To Work Day


Many of us spend more time at work than at home, so it’s really important to have fulfilling relationships both with colleagues and customers. Bring Your Manners To Work Day was created by The Protocol School of Washington to remind people of the importance of treating people with courtesy and respect in the workplace. Everyone should practice good manners, whether at work or at home, and common bad manners at work include things like loud ringtones, not cleaning up after yourself and polite conversation.

Although Bring Your Manners To Work Day is just one day of the year, it doesn't mean you should only be polite at work for one day. Use the day as a reminder of the importance of good manners every day of the year, and you may well find good manners help to open the doors to new opportunities in the workplace.

It's been said that good manners will open doors that the best education cannot. Not surprisingly, there's a good bit of research to support the point, too.

A recent survey by OfficeTeam found that 80 percent of executives say clothing affects an employee's chances of earning a promotion. In a separate survey, the company also found that nearly 40 percent of managers do not respond favorably to social media "friend" requests from employees while 46 percent aren't keen on connecting with their boss on social media.

But leading the way in terms of contributing to poor form in the work place — and not all that surprisingly — is the inappropriate use of technology. In fact, a recent study by Robert Half Technology found that 64 percent of surveyed CIOs said the increase use of mobile devices, including cell phones and tablets, has led to a significant increase in breaches of workplace etiquette.

That's up from the 51 percent who reported failures in etiquette just three years ago.

It's for reasons like these that The Protocol School of Washington® established Bring Your Manners to Work Day.

Commemorated annually on the first Friday of September, the day is intended to remind employees and employers that manners matter. From talking loudly on one's cell phone and texting during meetings to dressing inappropriately and showing up late, bad manners aren't just bad form, their bad for business.

Because it's statistically important to Bring Your Manners to Work every day, The Protocol School of Washington offers the following dos and don'ts:
  • Don't cell yell. People tend to speak three times louder on a cell phone than in person. Mind your volume.
  • Do respect people's personal space while on the phone. A ‘safe cell distance' is considered to be 10 feet.
  • Don't check your phone during meals and meetings. Instead keep phones off or on vibrate and pay attention to and engage those around you.
  • Do dress appropriately for the work place. In other words, save the see-through dresses, sandals with socks, Lycra bike shorts, muscle shirts, and plunging necklines for other occasions.
  • Don't "borrow" from other people's desks or (dare I even say it) lunches without permission.
  • Do clean up your messes, be it in the kitchen or at the copier, don't expect others to clean up after you.
  • Don't gossip. Over-sharing about your own personal life should also be avoided.
  • Do be on time to meetings, conference calls, and appointments.
  • Don't sink to someone else's standards. Just because coworkers behave badly is not a reason for you to follow suit. Always keep your poise and do the right thing, even if you're doing it alone. It matters and will be noticed.
If a coworker's behavior is infringing upon your ability to perform your job well, address it directly with the individual.

Clearly state how their behavior is impacting you, and, perhaps, others. Kindly request a change of behavior emphasizing how everyone could benefit from it. If the problem persists and is truly more than a mere annoyance, then bring it to the attention of your supervisor.

On the other hand, if a change happens, by all means be sure to say "thank you."

International Day of Charity


Charity contributes to the promotion of dialogue, solidarity and mutual understanding ‎among people.‎

Poverty persists in all countries of the world, ‎regardless of their economic, social and cultural situation, particularly in developing countries.

In recognition of the role of charity in alleviating humanitarian crises and human ‎suffering within and among nations, as well as of the efforts of charitable organizations ‎and individuals, including the work of Mother Teresa, the General Assembly of the ‎United Nations in its resolution A/RES/67/105PDF document designated the 5th of September, the ‎anniversary of the death of Mother Teresa, as the International Day of Charity.‎

On this International Day of Charity, the United Nations invites all Member States and all international and regional organizations, as well as civil society, including non-governmental organizations and individuals, to commemorate the Day in an appropriate manner, by encouraging charity, including through education and public awareness-raising activities.

Charity, like the notions of volunteerism and philanthropy, provides real social bonding and contributes to the creation of inclusive and more resilient societies. Charity can alleviate the worst effects of humanitarian crises, supplement public services in health care, education, housing and child protection. It assists the advancement of culture, science, sports, and the protection of cultural and natural heritage. It also promotes the rights of the marginalized and underprivileged and spreads the message of humanity in conflict situations.

The International Day of Charity was established with the objective of sensitizing and mobilizing people, NGOs, and stakeholders all around the world to to help others through volunteer and philanthropic activities.

The date of 5 September was chosen in order to commemorate the anniversary of the passing away of Mother Teresa of Calcutta, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979 "for work undertaken in the struggle to overcome poverty and distress, which also constitute a threat to peace."

Mother TeresaMother Teresa, the renowned nun and missionary, was born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in 1910. In 1928 she went to India, where she devoted herself to helping the destitute. In 1948 she became an Indian citizen and founded the order of Missionaries of Charity in Kolkota (Calcutta) in 1950, which became noted for its work among the poor and the dying in that city.

For over 45 years she ministered to the poor, sick, orphaned and dying, while guiding the Missionaries of Charity’s expansion, first in India and then in other countries, including hospices and homes for the poorest and homeless. Mother Teresa’s work has been recognized and acclaimed throughout the world and she has received a number of awards and distinctions, including the Nobel Peace Prize. Mother Teresa died on September 5th 1997, at 87 years of age.

Jury Rights Day


On September 5, we celebrate Jury Rights Day.  On this day in 1670, Quaker William Penn of London was arrested, pled not guilty, and subsequently argued against England’s Conventicle Acts, which outlawed the practice of religions other than the Church of England.

The judge instructed the jurors to find Penn guilty. The jurors’ refusal to enforce a bad law led to the court jailing and withholding food and water from the jurors.

Some of the jurors appealed their fines and imprisonment.  The higher court confirmed the right of the jurors to base their verdict on their best judgment and conscience.  Even though there was a law against freedom of religion, the high court held that juries could not be required to enforce any law they thought was wrong.

This higher court ruling established that jurors cannot be punished for their verdict.  It also set a foundation for our rights of freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and freedom of assembly.

This ruling established protection for the jury, and firmly established the right of the jurors to refuse to accept bad government laws.  This refusal of bad laws is called jury nullification or jury veto.  Through jury nullification, people can control their government by refusing to allow bad laws to be enforced.

These underlying common law concepts firmly establish the fact that Jurors cannot be punished for their verdict. As well, jurors are not required to give a reason for the verdict they render. The fundamental right of Jurors to render their verdict based on conscience is basic to the preservation of Justice, in a free society.

William Penn later came to Colonial America and founded Pennsylvania.  Jurors continue to have the authority to nullify bad laws.  This authority is our peaceful protection to stop corrupt government servants from violating our rights.