Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Holidays and Observances for Mar 11 2015

Dream Day


It is time to sit back and relax and enjoy Dream Day!

But do not use it as an excuse to slip back into bed – Dream Day was set up by an instructor at Columbia University in 2012 as a way of helping us all achieve our dreams and to make the world a better place.

You can organise a special dream event, where a gang of you get together and talk about your dreams, or you can stay at home and dream of what you most want from life. We are talking more about ‘achieve my full potential’ and ‘end world hunger’ here, not ‘lose 10lbs’ or ‘get revenge on my boss’!

Come up with an inspiring dream, then work out an action plan to make it happen, and to help everyone else achieve their dreams too.

It is so simple, and there lies its beauty: All you have to do is… dream!

Johnny Appleseed Day


John Chapman (September 26, 1774 – March 11, 1845), often called Johnny Appleseed, was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as the northern counties of present day West Virginia. He became an American legend while still alive, due to his kind, generous ways, his leadership in conservation, and the symbolic importance he attributed to apples. He was also a missionary for The New Church (Swedenborgian) and the inspiration for many museums and historical sights such as the Johnny Appleseed Museum in Urbana, Ohio and the Johnny Appleseed Heritage Center in between Lucas, Ohio and Mifflin, Ohio.

Johnny Appleseed is remembered in American popular culture by his traveling song or Swedenborgian hymn ("The Lord is good to me..."), which is today sung before meals in some American households. "Oooooh, the Lord is good to me, and so I thank the Lord, for giving me the things I need, the sun and the rain and the appleseed. The Lord is good to me. Amen, Amen, Amen, Amen, Amen."

Many books and films have been based on the life of Johnny Appleseed. One notable account is from the first chapter of The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan.[35] Pollan states that since Johnny Appleseed was against grafting, his apples were not of an edible variety and could be used only for cider: "Really, what Johnny Appleseed was doing and the reason he was welcome in every cabin in Ohio and Indiana was he was bringing the gift of alcohol to the frontier. He was our American Dionysus."

In 2003, North Carolina Playwright Keith Smith wrote a one act musical play entitled My Name is Johnny Appleseed, which is presented to school children to show that the true story of John Chapman is just as interesting as the mythical figure, who is shrouded in legend and fable.

The television series The Adventures of Jim Bowie presented a fictitious meeting between Jim Bowie and Johnny. The episode showed Johnny living a simple life on a small orchard, knowing he would be reunited with his true love after death.

One of the more successful films was Melody Time, the animated 1948 film from Walt Disney Studios featuring Dennis Day. The Legend of Johnny Appleseed, a 19-minute segment, tells the story of an apple farmer who sees others going west, wistfully wishing he was not tied down by his orchard, until an angel appears, singing an apple song, setting Johnny on a mission. When he treats a skunk kindly, all animals everywhere thereafter trust him. The cartoon featured lively tunes, and a childlike simplicity of message. This animated short was included in Disney's American Legends, a compilation of four animated shorts.

Supposedly, the only surviving tree planted by Johnny Appleseed is on the farm of Richard and Phyllis Algeo of Nova, Ohio. Some marketers claim it is a Rambo, although the Rambo was introduced to America in the 1640s by Peter Gunnarsson Rambo, more than a century before John Chapman was born. Some even make the claim that the Rambo was "Johnny Appleseed's favorite variety", ignoring that he had religious objections to grafting and preferred wild apples to all named varieties. It appears most nurseries are calling the tree the "Johnny Appleseed" variety, rather than a Rambo. Unlike the mid-summer Rambo, the Johnny Appleseed variety ripens in September and is a baking-applesauce variety similar to an Albemarle Pippen. Nurseries offer the Johnny Appleseed tree as an immature apple tree for planting, with scions from the Algeo stock grafted on them. Orchardists do not appear to be marketing the fruit of this tree.

References to Johnny Appleseed abound in popular culture. Johnny Appleseed is a character in Neil Gaiman's American Gods. Rock music bands NOFX, Guided by Voices, and Joe Strummer and the Mescaleros have all released songs titled "Johnny Appleseed". "Johnny Appleseed" also featured in a comic series in The Victor in the UK in the early sixties. In Philip Roth's novel American Pastoral, the central character imagines himself as Johnny Appleseed when he moves from Newark to a rural community; in this case the figure stands for an innocent, childlike version of the American pioneer spirit. The Japanese role-playing game Wild ARMs 5 mentions Johnny Appleseed as a central figure in the plotline.

Apple Inc. uses a "John Appleseed" character as a John Smith in many of its recent adverts, video tutorials, and keynote presentation examples; this was also the alias of Mike Markkula under which he published several programs for the Apple II. "John Appleseed" also appears as a contact in many of Apple, inc.'s application demonstrations. The name appears on the caller ID, as a sender in "mail" application demonstrations and screenshots and also in the icons of the "TextEdit" and "Logic Pro X" application.

Shelley Duvall's Tall Tales & Legends featured Johnny Appleseed, as played by Martin Short, in 1986. Also featuring Rob Reiner as Jack Smith and Molly Ringwald as his niece Jenny, the story- while entertaining- takes considerable liberties with the original tall tale.

Robert Heinlein's science fiction novel Farmer in the Sky, which depicts future colonists on Ganymede, and takes up consciously many of the themes of the 19th century American frontier and homesteading, also includes a character who is known as "Johnny Appleseed" and like the historical one is involved in planting and spreading apple trees.

John Clute's science fiction novel Appleseed (2001) centers on a character who may (or may not) be the immortal John Chapman.

John Chapman and his brother Nathaniel are characters in Alice Hoffman's novel, The Red Garden. They appear in the chapter "Eight Nights of Love" as passing through the small town of Blackwell, where they plant an orchard but also the Tree of Life, in the center of said town, a tree which is said to bloom and bear fruit in mid-winter. In Hoffman's book, John has a brief relation with a young woman called Minette Jacob, who was about to hang herself after having lost her husband, child, mother and sister, but who regains the joy of life after meeting the brothers. In the beginning of the chapter the author hints that John was reading Swedenborg's pamphlets and later in the novel, the characters actually refer to him as Johnny Appleseed. The variety of apples is called by the residents "Blackwell Look-No-Further."

National Oatmeal Nut Waffles Day


It’s National Oatmeal Nut Waffles Day! Waffles became a popular baked treat during the Middle Ages. The original recipe called for just flour and water, so vendors sold waffles on the streets during the religious fasting season. Bakers branded the waffles with coats of arms, religious symbols, and the traditional honeycomb pattern we are accustomed to today. Eventually people began adding other ingredients like eggs, butter, milk, and honey.

Looking for a healthier version of this breakfast classic? Make a delicious batch of oatmeal nut waffles with nutritious whole grain oats and chopped pecans mixed right into the batter. Top your oatmeal waffles with peanut butter and syrup, or pair with yogurt and honey for a complete breakfast.

Happy National Oatmeal Nut Waffles Day!

Registered Dietitian Day


March 11, will mark the eighth annual Registered Dietitian Day. As the nation's food and nutrition experts, registered dietitians are committed to improving the health of their patients and community. Registered Dietitian Day commemorates the dedication of RDs as advocates for advancing the nutritional status of Americans and people around the world Registered Dietitian Day was created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to increase the awareness of registered dietitians as the indispensable providers of food and nutrition services and to recognize RDs for their commitment to helping people enjoy healthy lives. Registered Dietitian Day and National Nutrition Month promote the Academy and RDs/RDNs to the public and the media as the most valuable and credible source of timely, scientifically-based food and nutrition information.

The first Registered Dietitian Day was celebrated in 2008. Registered Dietitians are the food and nutrition experts who can translate the science of nutrition into practical solutions for healthy living. Registered Dietitians have degrees in nutrition, dietetics, public health or a related field from well-respected, accredited colleges and universities, completed an internship and passed an examination. Registered Dietitians use their nutrition expertise to help individuals make unique, positive lifestyle changes. Registered Dietitians are advocates for advancing the nutritional status of Americans and people around the world.

World Plumbing Day


World Plumbing Day is an international event, initiated by the World Plumbing Council, held on 11 March each year to recognize the important role plumbing plays in societal health and amenity.

The WPC, through its member countries and its partnerships with bodies like the World Health Organisation, works all year round to promote the benefits of safe plumbing, but in 2010 it decided to launch the concept of embedding a single day on the world’s calendar dedicated to plumbing. The idea was that on March 11 each year people all over the world would pause to reflect on the vital role plumbing plays in preserving their health and way of life – in the case of countries like ours – or in building sustainable disease free futures for millions in the developing world.

And so World Plumbing Day was born, and it is big and getting bigger all the time. Today, on the continents of Australia, Europe and Africa events are organised to mark the occasion and draw attention to the importance of good plumbing and sanitation. In China, England, Germany, India, Canada, North and South America and many more places industry leaders – like us here today – governments, policy makers, and community based organisations are promoting World Plumbing Day.

Right now, today, in offices and training colleges, on work sites and in classrooms, and in legislatures and Parliaments around the world, World Plumbing Day is being marked and recognized. In media releases and magazine articles in Chinese, Hindi, English, German and Spanish the message about the link between good plumbing sanitation and human and environmental health is reaching millions of people each March.