Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Holidays and Observances for Mar 24 2015

American Diabetes Association Alert Day


American Diabetes Association Alert Day, observed annually on the fourth Tuesday in March, is a one-day wake-up call to inform the American public about the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when diabetes is left undiagnosed or untreated. This year Diabetes Alert Day will be observed on March 24, 2015.

In 2013, we had over 39,000 people take the risk test and during the month of March, we had over 148,000 with 37 percent of them being at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. We are excited to once again encourage the public to take the risk test by driving them to Facebook where they can also ask questions, engage with our community, and share the test with friends and loved ones. For every Diabetes Risk Test taken, Boar’s Head Brand® - a leading provider of premium delicatessen products - will donate $5 to the American Diabetes Association starting March 25 through April 25, 2014, up to $50,000.

The tagline for our 26th Annual American Diabetes Association Alert Day will be “Take it. Share it. Step Out.” We will not only be encouraging the public to take the risk test and share it, but we will be asking them to start living a healthy and active lifestyle. One way to do this is by joining one of our Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes events nationwide. Our Step Out events happen mainly in October and what better way to get active now than by gearing up for a walk event in your area. 

Why is Alert Day important? Diabetes is a serious disease that strikes nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States, and a quarter of them—seven million—do not even know they have it. An additional 79 million, or one in three American adults, have prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, diagnosis often comes seven to 10 years after the onset of the disease, after disabling and even deadly complications have had time to develop. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical to successful treatment and delaying or preventing some of its complications such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation and death. 

The Association has made a strong commitment to primary prevention of type 2 diabetes by increasing awareness of prediabetes and actively engaging individuals in preventative behaviors like weight loss, physical activity and healthful eating. Alert Day is a singular moment in time in which we can raise awareness and prompt action among the general public – particularly those at risk. 

Who should participate in Alert Day? Everyone should be aware of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People who are overweight, under active (living a sedentary lifestyle) and over the age of 45 should consider themselves at risk for the disease. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and people who have a family history of the disease also are at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed by losing just 7 percent of body weight (such as 15 pounds if you weigh 200) through regular physical activity (30 minutes a day, five days a week) and healthy eating. By understanding your risk, you can take the necessary steps to help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

What will happen on Alert Day? For 26 years, the American Diabetes Association has set aside one special day for people to learn if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a growing epidemic in the United States, but it can be controlled with knowledge and healthy behavior. From March 25 through April 25, the Association will be encouraging the public to take the Diabetes Risk Test, as well as to share the test with everyone they care about - friends, family members and colleagues. As previously mentioned, the Association will be encouraging the public to start living a healthy and active lifestyle by asking them to join a Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes event in their area. With each person that takes the test, knows their risk and gets started living a healthy and active lifestyle, the Association is that much closer to stopping diabetes.

The Diabetes Risk Test asks users to answer simple questions about weight, age, family history and other potential risks for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Preventative tips are provided for everyone who takes the test, including encouraging those at high risk to talk with their health care provider. 

 How does one obtain the Association's Diabetes Risk Test and additional information about diabetes and a Step Out event near them? You can be part of the movement to Stop Diabetes® and get your free Diabetes Risk Test (English or Spanish), as well as information about diabetes and joining a Step Out event by visiting us on Facebook, stopdiabetes.com or by calling 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383). Although Alert Day is a one-day event, the Diabetes Risk Test is available year-round.

International Day for the Right to the Truth Concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for Dignity of Victims


The United Nations (UN) holds a special day to promote a human rights issue on March 24 each year. This day is called the “International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims”.

The UN holds various global activities to promote this event. It also encourages governments and people worldwide to observe this international day by:

  • Honoring victims of human rights violations and promote the importance of the right to truth and justice.
  • Paying tribute to those who have devoted their lives to, and lost their lives in, the struggle to promote and protect human rights for all.
  • Recognizing the important work and values of Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero, of El Salvador, who was assassinated on March 24, 1980, after denouncing human rights violations and defending the principles of protecting lives, promoting human dignity and opposing violence.
The UN General Assembly, in its resolution, invites all Member States, international organizations and civil society organizations and individuals, to observe the International Day in an appropriate manner.

In a study conducted in 2006 the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights concluded that the right to the truth about gross human rights violations and serious violations of human rights law is an inalienable and autonomous right, linked to the duty and obligation of the State to protect and guarantee human rights, to conduct effective investigations and to guarantee effective remedy and reparations.

The study affirms that the right to the truth implies knowing the full and complete truth as to the events that transpired, their specific circumstances, and who participated in them, including knowing the circumstances in which the violations took place, as well as the reasons for them.

In a 2009 report on the Right to the Truth, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights identified best practices for the effective implementation of this right, in particular practices relating to archives and records concerning gross violations of human rights, and programs on the protection of witnesses and other persons involved in trials connected with such violations.

The Commission on the Truth for El Salvador was established in accordance with the Mexico Agreements of 27 April 1991 to investigate serious acts of violence that had occurred since 1980 and whose impact on society was deemed to require an urgent public knowledge of the truth.  In its report of 15 March 1993, the Commission documented the facts of the assassination of Archbishop Oscar ArnulfoRomero by pro-government forces, the so-called "death squads".  He was shot dead by an assassin as he celebrated mass on 24 March 1980.

National Chocolate Covered Raisins Day


It's National Chocolate-Covered Raisin Day! Did you know that NestlĂ© Raisinets are one of the most popular candies for movie-goers? People can’t get enough of the delicious fruit and dark chocolate combination!

Chocolate-covered raisins are a popular bulk vending product. They consist, as the name suggests, of raisins coated in a shell of either milk chocolate or dark chocolate. They have a reputation in many countries of being food eaten in movie theaters, and are an item familiar from the concession counter. The supermarket chains also sell them in bags and they were traditionally sold by weight from jars in candy stores.

The historical origins of the chocolate covered raisin are unknown. However an early reference is suggested in a popular German folk tale that mentions a “wenig Schokolade Ball” (little chocolate ball). It is also likely that some precursor form of this food existed in Mesoamerican cultures, given consumption of cacao based foods within these ancient societies e.g a chocolate coated nut, or berry.

Culinary historians believe that humans first discovered raisins when they came across grapes drying on a vine. These sun-dried morsels soon became one of the most popular food sweeteners, second only to honey. Raisins are an excellent source fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, and certain B vitamins. Add some dark chocolate into the mix and you’ll also get a healthy dose of antioxidants and important minerals.

Enjoy a handful of chocolate-covered raisins today in honor of National Chocolate-Covered Raisin Day!

World Tuberculosis Day


On March 24, 1882, Dr. Robert Koch announced the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB). During this time, TB killed one out of every seven people living in the United States and Europe. Dr. Koch’s discovery was the most important step taken toward the control and elimination of this deadly disease.

In 1982, a century after Dr. Koch's announcement, the first World TB Day was sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD). The event was intended to educate the public about the devastating health and economic consequences of TB, its effect on developing countries, and its continued tragic impact on global health.

Today, World TB Day is commemorated across the globe with activities as diverse as the locations in which they are held. But more can be done to raise awareness about the effects of TB. Among infectious diseases, TB remains the second leading killer of adults in the world, with 1.5 million TB-related deaths in 2010.

Until TB is controlled, World TB Day won’t be a celebration. But it is a valuable opportunity to educate the public about the devastation TB can spread and how it can be stopped.

Each year, we recognize World TB Day on March 24, often with a variety of activities leading up to the official day. This annual event commemorates the date in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes tuberculosis (TB).

World TB Day provides the opportunity to raise awareness about TB-related problems and solutions and to support worldwide TB-control efforts. While great strides have been made to control and cure TB, people still get sick and die from this disease in our country. Much more needs to be done to eliminate this disease.

This year CDC selected the theme "Find TB. Treat TB. Working together to eliminate TB." to highlight that TB is still a life-threatening problem in the United States, despite the declining number of TB cases. Anyone can get TB, and our current efforts to find and treat latent TB infection and TB disease are not sufficient. Misdiagnosis of TB still exists and health care professionals often do not "think TB."

This World TB Day, we call for further collaboration to find and treat TB. By working together to raise awareness that TB still exists and sharing the personal stories of those people affected by TB, we can bring attention to this public health problem.

This year’s World TB Day theme encourages local and state TB programs to reach out to their communities to raise awareness about TB. We don’t have to fight TB alone; we should partner with others who are also caring for those most at risk for TB such as people with HIV infection or diabetes, and the homeless. Everyone has a role in ensuring that one day TB will be eliminated. CDC and our partners are committed to a world free of TB.

Call for a World Free of TB
The fight to eliminate TB will only be successful if local, state, national, and international partners from all sectors of our society join resources and collaborate to find solutions.

Our united effort is needed to reach those at highest risk for TB and to identify and implement innovative strategies to improve testing and treatment among high-risk populations.

CDC and its domestic and international partners, including the National TB Controllers AssociationStop TB USA, and the global Stop TB Partnership are taking many steps to stop further spread of TB and to reduce the overall burden of the disease. Efforts range from developing new treatment regimens and increasing the capacity of health professionals to provide adequate treatment, to issuing new recommendations for improved testing and treatment for U.S. immigrants.