Saturday, March 7, 2015

Holidays and Observances for Mar 7 2015

Descendants Day




Climb into your family tree! Jiggle some branches.  Start piecing together your personal history via one of the world’s most intriguing hobbies, genealogy!  Discover the names of the branches of your family tree. There are fascinating name puzzles ready to be put together.

Descendants are those who are the issue of an individual, such as children, grandchildren, and their children, to the remotest degree. Descendants are those in a descending line of birth from an individual, rather than an ascending line, such as to the parents of the individual. Determining who a person's descendants are is commonly necessary to determine who is entitled to share in the estate of a person who dies without a will. State statutes of descent and distribution, which vary by state, provide for the surviving spouse and/or descendants to share in the estate of the deceased. Parents of the deceased often do not share in the estate unless there are no surviving descendants or spouse.

A lineal descendant is a direct descendant of a person. A person in direct line of blood relationship following downwards from an individual concerned, starting from his children, grandchildren and great grand children, are called lineal descendants of an individual.

National Be Heard Day


It’s easy for big businesses to steal the spotlight.  March 7th is National Be Heard Day.  The holiday is dedicated to over 145 million small businesses in the U.S. that are struggling to break through the big-business dominated media clutter.  Today is a day for small businesses to stand up and “be heard”.  Celebrate creative marketing and publicity tactics that help small businesses survive in a world of behemoth corporate giants.  Support small businesses and celebrate National Be Heard Day!

Small businesses are normally privately owned corporations, partnerships, or sole proprietorships. What businesses are defined as "small" in terms of government support and tax policy varies depending on the country and industry. Small businesses range from 15 employees under the Australian Fair Work Act 2009, 50 employees according to the definition used by the European Union, and fewer than 500 employees to qualify for many U.S. Small Business Administration programs. Small businesses can also be classified according to other methods such as sales, assets, or net profits.

Small businesses are common in many countries, depending on the economic system in operation. Typical examples include:convenience stores, other small shops (such as a bakery or delicatessen), hairdressers, tradesmen, lawyers, accountants,restaurants, guest houses, photographers, small-scale manufacturing, and online businesses, such as web design and programming, etc.
According to the US Small Business Association "In 2011, there were 28.2 million small businesses" and "Small businesses employ about half of U.S. workers." For more stats on small businesses in the USA visit SBA.gov or Independent We Stand.

National Cereal Day



Strange that the invention of breakfast cereal was founded on the fact that the American diet of the mid 1800s was a poor one packed with protein, booze and caffeine. Or maybe it’s not so strange. After all, cereal was considered a remedy – a sort of 19th-century health or wonder food for the ailing masses.

So if you're raising a milk-sopped spoonful of oats or bran or wheat today, give a little nod to National Cereal Day, which honors this classic morning meal and midnight snack on March 7.

Some Cereal History
Americans at the time of the Civil War were increasingly plagued with gastrointestinal issues due to their unhealthy, meat-based diet. Reformers of the 1860s viewed too much meat consumption as unwholesome, both physically and spiritually. It was believed by some that a high-protein diet contributed to lust and sloth and that constipation and other maladies of the gastrointestinal tract were God’s punishment for too much pork and beef.

But before cereal took on loads of sugar, cartoon characters as marketing mascots and high profit margins of today, it was a food product of quite a different animal.  Cereal back then was quite literally hard to swallow. Made of dense bran nuggets the cereal was so hard it had to be soaked overnight to make digestion not so taxing. Its taste was pretty bland, too.

The Kellogg Brothers
Bran nuggets’ inventor Dr. James Caleb Jackson operated a sanitarium, a health resort of sorts, in which patrons would come to convalesce, improve their health or enjoy the restorative spa treatments available. One of the patrons would go on to form the Seventh Day Adventist religion. One of the members of her new church was John Kellogg, a skilled surgeon whose dedication to healthy food for his patients led to the creation of granola. 

With the help of his brother, Will Kellogg, the pair would continue to invent healthy, meatless breakfast foods until inadvertently concocting a process that allowed wheat to flake. Two years later corn flakes were formulated and they became an immediate success.

Charles William Post
Charles William Post would get in on the act while recuperating from his second nervous breakdown in 1893. He just so happened to be at the same sanitarium that the Kellogg brothers attended.  His visit there inspired him to open his own spa and to further his interest in coffee products and breakfast foods. By 1897, he was selling what is today known as Grape-nuts and his own brand of corn flakes otherwise known as Post Toasties.

Sweetened Cereal
By 1939, thanks to sugar and marketing savvy, cereal as a health food started to change. That’s when the first sweetened cereal, Ranger Joe Popped Wheat Honnie appeared in grocery stores, which would set the trend for a sweetened product that appealed to children. Radio and TV ads also advanced the popularity of cereal with cartoon characters appearing on the box and the box appearing or being mentioned in cartoons and stories. 

Cereal Facts
Cap’n Crunch’s full name is Horatio Magellan Crunch. He was born on Crunch Island in the Sea of Milk. In 2013, a food blogger noticed the Cap’n’s uniform only sported three stripes instead of four. This would make him a Navy Commander, a step down from a true Captain. When word got out, Cap’n Crunch declared on Twitter, “Of course I’m a Cap’n! It’s the Crunch—not the clothes—that make a man.”

Kix cereal issued its atomic-energy inspired Lone Ranger ring in 1947. The ring actually contained trace amounts of radioactive polonium which glowed. Sadly, the material inside the rings had a short shelf life and none in existence work today.

Of the more than 314 million people in the U.S., 49 per cent start their day with a bowl of cereal.

Astronauts from Apollo 11 boosted their brain power while in space with a cereal breakfast. The cereal was mixed with fruit and pressed into cubes since the lack of gravity kept the astronauts from pouring it into a bowl with milk.

There are 2.7 billion boxes -- enough to wrap around the earth thirteen times -- of cereal sold every year.

National Crown Roast of Pork Day


A crown fit for a serious fan of the other white meat - March 7 is National Crown Roast of Pork Day!

Turn your normal meal into a royal feast with this white-capped crown of pork glory.

Known as the crown roast, pork loin is gathered into a circle with the rib bones pointing upwards like the peaks of a crown. Usually, this contains two rib racks, or 12 ribs from one pork loin, tied together with twine. This also means "Frenching" the ribs - slightly cutting and cracking the bone so they can be molded into a crown.

The meatiest part of the impressive crown roast is at the bottom, facing inwards. And any serious pork fan knows that the rib portion of the loin is one of the choicest and tastiest cuts.

A holiday entree fit for a king, or just worthy of celebrating the fact that it's Wednesday, the convenient crown shape also enables you to fill up the center with stuffing - so do with that what you will.

Serve a stately supper with this crown roast of pork, roasted garlic and gravy. It just may make a royal impression on that certain someone.