Friday, May 22, 2015

Holidays and Observances for May 22 2015

Don't Fry Day


The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention Encourages Everyone to Protect Your Skin Today and Every Day

The National Council Declares the Friday before Memorial Day, May 22, 2015 is “Don’t Fry Day” To Encourage Sun Safety Awareness

To help reduce rising rates of skin cancer from overexposure to the ultraviolet (UV) rays of the sun, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention has designated the Friday before Memorial Day as “Don’t Fry Day” to encourage sun safety awareness and to remind everyone to protect their skin while enjoying the outdoors. Because no single step can fully protect you and your family from overexposure to UV radiation, follow as many of the following tips as possible:
  • Do Not Burn or Tan
  • Seek Shade
  • Wear Sun-Protective Clothing
  • Generously Apply Sunscreen
  • Use Extra Caution Near Water, Snow, and Sand
  • Get Vitamin D Safely
As warm weather approaches and millions of Americans prepare to enjoy the great outdoors, the risk for ultraviolet (UV) damage of the skin increases. Skin cancer is on the rise in the United States, and the American Cancer Society estimates that one American dies every hour from skin cancer. This year alone, the American Cancer Society estimates there will be more than 73,870 new cases of malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, and more than two million new cases of basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers in the U.S.

Fortunately, skin cancer is highly curable if found early and can be prevented. Remember to Slip! Slop! Slap!...and Wrap when you’re outdoors — slip on a shirt, slop on broad spectrum sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher, slap on a wide-brimmed hat, and wrap on sunglasses. The best way to detect skin cancer early is to examine your skin regularly and recognize changes in moles and skin growths.

Most skin cancers are caused by overexposure to UV radiation. Individuals with lighter-toned skin are more susceptible to UV damage, although people of all races and ethnicities can be at risk for skin cancer. Those who have a family history of skin cancer, plenty of moles or freckles, or a history of severe sunburns early in life are at a higher risk of skin cancer as well. To minimize the harmful effects of excessive and unprotected sun exposure, protection from intense UV radiation should be a life-long practice for everyone.

The National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention is a united voice to reduce skin cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, through awareness, prevention, early detection, research, and advocacy.

Harvey Milk Day


Our Equality Movement across the globe will celebrate the life story, message, and legacy of my uncle Harvey Milk. Join thousands across the globe to honor his memory and celebrate his message of hope. We are asking you to celebrate Harvey Milk’s life story, message and legacy in celebrating globally on his birthday to give hope and inspire disenfranchised communities.

Harvey was a pioneer of the 20th century. His struggle and his deeds will prove to history that there's no such thing as a gay way, there is only one way. We can make Harvey live forever by continuing to do things his way, in the deeds and in the accomplishments of our daily efforts to make our world live.

He believed broad public education and dialogue was paramount to his life’s work as a civil rights leader and with your energy we hope you will work to inspire individuals, communities and organizations to carry on his values in a timeless vision for a better world.

Harvey Bernard Milk (May 22, 1930 – November 27, 1978) was an American politician who became the first openly gay man to be elected to public office in California, when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Politics and gay activism were not his early interests; he was not open about his homosexuality and did not participate in civic matters until around the age of 40, after his experiences in the counterculture of the 1960s.

Milk moved from New York City to settle in San Francisco in 1972 amid a migration of gay men to the Castro District. He took advantage of the growing political and economic power of the neighborhood to promote his interests, and ran unsuccessfully for political office three times. His theatrical campaigns earned him increasing popularity, and Milk won a seat as a city supervisor in 1977, part of the broader social changes the city was experiencing.

Milk served 11 months in office and was responsible for passing a stringent gay rights ordinance for the city. On November 27, 1978, Milk and Mayor George Moscone were assassinated by Dan White, another city supervisor who had recently resigned but wanted his job back. Milk's election was made possible by and was a key component of a shift in San Francisco politics. The assassinations and the ensuing events were the result of continuing ideological conflicts in the city.

Despite his short career in politics, Milk became an icon in San Francisco and "a martyr for gay rights", according to University of San Francisco professor Peter Novak. In 2002, Milk was called "the most famous and most significantly open LGBT official ever elected in the United States". Anne Kronenberg, his final campaign manager, wrote of him: "What set Harvey apart from you or me was that he was a visionary. He imagined a righteous world inside his head and then he set about to create it for real, for all of us." Milk was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

Heat Awareness Day


With summer officially a month away, and unusually cool weather forecast for the weekend, most of us can’t wait for the return of hot and sunny days. But with summer months come heat and humidity. The Friday before Memorial Day is Heat Awareness Day, promoted by the National Weather Service, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Heat Awareness Day is a national public awareness campaign for Americans to understand the dangers of extreme heat, to know the signs of heat emergencies, and to know how to stay safe during extreme heat conditions.

Last June and July, Ohio was introduced to a new severe weather incident: the derecho, a widespread, long-lived wind storm that caused massive power outages. While the power was out, Ohio was hit by a heat wave forcing temperatures above 100 degrees.

Knowing what to do before severe weather strikes can save lives:
  • Contact your local emergency management office to learn about emergency plans and what to include in yours.
  • Make a family disaster plan that includes out-of-town contacts and locations to reunite if your family becomes separated.
  • Assemble a three-day disaster supplies kit with food, water, medical supplies, a battery-powered radio and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio, batteries, flashlights, and other items. If you have the space, consider storing enough food, water and supplies to last for a month, in case situations warrant extended evacuation or sheltering.
  • If you need special care, make plans now. Consider how you will get to a shelter if your mobility is impaired; where will you get your medication; does your medication need to be refrigerated?
Before Extreme Heat
  • Cover windows that receive morning or afternoon sun with drapes, shades or awnings (outdoor awnings or louvers can reduce the heat that enters a home by up to 80 percent). Install temporary window reflectors between windows and drapes, such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
  • Weather-strip doors and sills to keep cool air in. Keep storm windows up all year.
During Extreme Heat
  • Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible. Contact your local health department or locate an air-conditioned shelter in your area.
  • Avoid strenuous work during the warmest part of the day. Use a buddy system when working in extreme heat, and take frequent breaks.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible.
  • Limit intake of caffeinated or alcoholic beverages. They can add to dehydration.
  • Drink two to four cups of water every hour while working or exercising outside.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who may not have air conditioning or who spend time alone.
  • Never leave children or pets alone in vehicles.
Know the Warning Signs
  • Heat Cramps – Muscular pains and spasms due to heavy exertion. Heat cramps are often the first signal that the body is having trouble with the heat.
  • Heat Exhaustion – Typically occurs when people exercise heavily or work in a hot, humid place where body fluids are lost through heavy sweating. Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood flow to decrease to the vital organs. This results in a form of mild shock. If not treated, the victim’s condition will worsen. Body temperature will keep rising and the victim may suffer heat stroke.
  • Heat Stroke (Sun Stroke) – A life-threatening condition. The victim’s temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly. Medical attention is necessary.
The best way to guard against heat-related issues is preparedness and prevention. Stay up-to-date on weather conditions by listening to your local radio or TV stations. Try to stay cool. If possible, limit outdoor activities to early mornings or evenings. Take frequent breaks and drink plenty of water. During prolonged periods of excessive heat, check on your neighbors to ensure their safety. If you have pets, remember to keep them cool and give them plenty of water, too.

International Day for Biological Diversity


On May 22, 1992, the text of the Convention on Biological Diversity was adopted by the of the United Nations at a conference in Nairobi, Kenya. Since 2001, the International Day for Biological Diversity is celebrated each year on the anniversary of this date.

A wide range of events are organized globally to increase the understanding of the important role of biodiversity in our future. Celebrations are organized by: the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity, which forms part of the United Nations Environmental Programme; many national governments; and a range of non-governmental organizations.

Activities include:
  • Translating booklets, leaflets and other educational resources into local languages.
  • Distributing information on biodiversity via schools, colleges, universities, newspapers, radio and television.
  • Exhibitions and seminars for students, professionals and the general public.
  • Showings of movies on environmental issues.
  • Presentations of programs to preserve endangered species or habitats.
  • Planting trees and other plants that help prevent erosion.
Politicians may also give speeches on local environmental issues and other events may include competitions for children and young people to take photographs or create artwork centered on the annual theme of the day.

In 1992 state and government leaders agreed on a strategy for sustainable development at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, also known as "The Earth Summit", in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Sustainable development is a way to meet the needs of people all over the world and ensuring that planet earth remains healthy and viable for future generations. One of the most important agreements reached during the Earth Summit was the Convention on Biological Diversity.

The Convention on Biological Diversity came into force on December 29, 1993, and each anniversary of this date was designated the International Day for Biological Diversity. From 2001 onwards the date of this celebration was moved to May 22 due to the number of holidays that fell in late December. On this date in 1992, the text of the Convention on Biological Diversity was adopted at a United Nations at a conference in Nairobi, Kenya.

Each year, the International Day for Biodiversity focuses on a particular theme. Recently, the themes have been: Biodiversity and Poverty Alleviation (2003); Biodiversity: Food, Water and Health for All (2004); Biodiversity: Life Insurance for our Changing World (2005); Protect Biodiversity in Drylands (2006); and Biodiversity and Climate Change (2007); and Biodiversity and Agriculture (2008).

The International Day for Biological Diversity is part of a series of activities to focus attention on the Convention on Biological Diversity. The symbol of this convention is a stylized image of a twig or branch with three green leaves. Depending on the background, the leaves may be just outlines or green blocks. Each year a piece of artwork is commissioned to reflect the theme. Details of the artwork are used as symbols for different aspects of the International Day for Biological Diversity.

National Buy a Musical Instrument Day


It’s National Buy a Musical Instrument Day! It is unknown when the first musical instrument was invented, but historians believe that flutes made of animal bones date back 37,000 years. Today there are 6 main instrument categories - percussion, woodwinds, brass, strings, keyboard, and electronic.

The most played instrument worldwide is the piano, followed by the guitar and the drums. 21 million Americans play the piano; which is more then all other instruments combined! Other popular instruments include the flute, ukulele, saxophone, clarinet, trombone, and violin. Not only is playing a musical instrument fun, it can also increase abilities in other areas. Children who play a musical instrument are shown to read at advanced levels, have larger vocabularies, and work better in teams. 

Playing a musical instrument is a fun and engaging activity for people of all ages. Celebrate today as you learn to play a new instrument, or tune up an old one! 

National Maritime Day


May 22 is National Maritime Day in the United States each year. This day reflects the gratitude that Americans have for the maritime industry and the benefits it brings to the country. It also recognizes ships and seafarers who have held a special place in the nation's history.

Many communities and organizations in the United States observe National Maritime Day in a variety of ways. Activities and events include open houses and special celebrations hosted by seaports. Some businesses may host special luncheons while other people attend memorial observances at merchant marine memorials. This day pays special tribute to the benefits that the maritime industry provides for the United States, as well as people who served as merchant mariners in service to their country.

National Maritime Day is observed on May 22, the date that the American steamship Savannah sailed from the United States to England. This event marked the first successful crossing of the Atlantic Ocean using steam propulsion.  On May 20, 1933, Congress declared May 22 as National Maritime Day. During World War II more than 250,000 members of the American Merchant Marine served their country, with more than 6700 giving their lives, hundreds being detained as prisoners of war and more than 800 ships being sunk or damaged.

In 2006 the Maritime Administration joined forces with the American Association of Port Authorities, the US Army Corps of Engineers, Waterways Council Inc, the US Coast Guard, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other entities involved in the maritime industry to raise the awareness of National Maritime Day and of the maritime industry as a whole.

The President is requested to issue each year a proclamation calling on: people to observe National Maritime Day by displaying the flag of the United States at their homes or other suitable places; and government officials to display the flag on all government buildings on National Maritime Day.

Some symbols that have been used to depict National Maritime Day include: an image or drawing of an anchor, strapped with a rope around the middle, to symbolize the maritime life; and an image or drawing of a steering wheel used on a ship or boat.

National Vanilla Pudding Day


Today is National Vanilla Pudding Day! The delicious, creamy pudding we know and love today has been around since the 19th century. Most culinary historians agree that our modern recipe evolved from custards, which date back to Ancient Rome.

Jell-O introduced its first line of instant pudding in the 1950s. The advertising campaign announcing the new product promoted it as a “busy-day dessert.” Check out one of the original commercial spots!

To celebrate National Vanilla Pudding Day, make some delicious homemade vanilla pudding from scratch, or from an instant mix! For an extra special treat, pair it with fresh fruit or chocolate. Yum!

National Wig Out Day


May 22, is National Wig Out Day. It’s a holiday always celebrated on the Friday before Memorial Day weekend when you can be anyone you want to be by donning a wig that isn’t even close to your normal hair color or style.

The holiday was invented in 2006 in Bellingham, Washington by sisters Kate and Alice Clark. They wanted to see friends wear all different kinds of wigs to work that day, then gather downtown after work to celebrate. It took off so well in Bellingham that it quickly spread across the country.

This is the day when you have permission to wear any hairstyle you’ve considered trying but never had the nerve. Have you always wanted to be a blonde? A brunette? A red head? Now is the time to wear a wig for a day that will let you see how you like it. You can also try out new hairstyles and haircuts you might not have the nerve to try on your real hair. Or, if you’ve always had stick straight hair and wanted wavy curls, you can try those on the wig you are wearing.

Bellingham’s celebration includes a Wig Walk parade around town, a Wig Out Contest, and a party with a group photo taken. That way there is documented evidence of who was wearing what wig on any given year.

If you live elsewhere, your town may not have these same events, but you can start your own event and promote it by posting on Facebook, Twitter or other social media. Invite all your friends, coworkers and relatives and tell them to invite everyone they know. It won’t take long for it to grow into a big wigged out party.

World Goth Day


May 22 is World Goth Day. The Official World Goth Day site defines it as "a day where the goth scene gets to celebrate its own being, and an opportunity to make its presence known to the rest of the world" 

World Goth Day originated in the UK in 2009. BBC Radio 6 was looking at a number of music subcultures. Goth DJs Cruel Britannia and Martin OldGoth got an event up and running. It was decided that May 22 would be the day when this event would be held regularly. 

The tradition continued and spread outside the UK, with a website being initiated to coordinate and advertise events worldwide.

World Goth Day celebrates the sub cultural aspects of the Goth subculture. Aspects of the culture like fashion, music and art are celebrated by fashion shows, art exhibitions and music performance. Many of the events feature local Goth bands, and some have taken on a charity aspect with events in the UK and Australia supporting favored charities like the UK Sophie Lancaster Foundation, a charity that tries to curb prejudice and hatred against subcultures.

The event has evolved to be now celebrated by goths all around the world, including the UK, the US, Australia, Singapore and South Africa.