Sunday, June 28, 2015

Holidays and Observances for June 28 2015

International Body Piercing Day


Throughout the world body modification has been used for many purposes, from self-expression, to rites of passage, shock value, even religious observances. There has been a growing movement in the western world driving body modification to the forefront of popular forms of expression and self-decoration. The history of body piercing isn't clear, as there is a lot of misleading information out there, but there is significant indicators that it has been practiced by both men and women since prehistory. Body Piercing Day is an opportunity for you to find a new way to express yourself with this age old practice.

Ear Piercing has been well known in Western Cultures for at least the last couple hundred years, and the evidence of it goes back quite a bit further, with evidence of ears and nose being pierced being discovered in the graves of many cultures, even as far back as 5,000 years ago. It was a well-known way of sending wealth along with the dead into the next life, and honoring them in their burial site.

But this is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg, lip and tongue piercings have been present in throughout the world, particularly well documented in African and American tribal cultures. Nipple can be tracked back at least as far the Ancient Romans, while genital piercing made a perhaps unexpected debut in Ancient India.

Body Piercing Day is originally dedicated to Jim Ward, often heralded as “the granddaddy of the body piercing movement”. Jim Ward has been an incredibly influential part of the new body modification movement, with a specific focus on body piercing. He has been part of the forward driving force for piercings in the western world, and helped to develop the basic techniques for piercing, with a special focus on genital piercings.

He is directly responsible for introducing the incredibly popular barbell piercing style to the US, the internal threading style of them was a vast improvement over existing piercing techniques. This technique he picked up from ‘Tattoo Samy’ from Frankfurt, who had come to visit him a number of times in the US after this.

Body Piercing Day is a great opportunity to finally take the plunge, and get yourself that piercing you've been contemplating. With the ability to choose from the ever growing selection of piercings, from ear piercings, nose piercings, lip, and cheek piercings, you can display your individuality with a piece that’s meaningful to you. 

Those are just the ones that are easily visible, when you take into account nipple piercings, the always sexy belly-button piercing, and the incredibly daring variety of genital piercings, there are tons of options for enhancing your life in some rather creative ways. Recent innovations have also brought into light the ‘dermal’, where a circle of skin is essentially punched out of your skin, and a mounting plate slipped under the surface. These can be placed just about anywhere on the body, but are quite common at the top of the sternum, with sparkling jewels or a loop ring being fastened on.

Body Piercing Day is a day to join the ever growing number of people who have started getting piercings. In England in 2005, a survey was done that revealed that 10% of people over the age of 16 have piercings in locations other than their earlobe. Women, as usual, are leading the charge in the newest form of fashion, and the men aren't far behind. Body Piercing Day is your day to be daring, so get out there and get pierced!

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY


OK, I’LL STOP SHOUTING.

IF YOU ARE PERUSING FACEBOOK OR TWITTER TODAY, THE CHANCES ARE YOU WILL SEE AT LEAST ONE STATUS UPDATE THAT IS COMPOSED ENTIRELY IN CAPITAL LETTERS.

THE REASON? WELL, TODAY IS OFFICIALLY INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY.

APPARENTLY, INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY IS A PARODIC HOLIDAY THAT WAS FIRST IMAGINED IN 2000 BY DEREK ARNOLD, WHO DEEMED THAT ON OCTOBER 22, EVERYONE ACROSS THE WORLD SHOULD TYPE ONLY IN CAPS LOCK.

WHY? YOU MIGHT ASK. AS ARNOLD PUT IT HIMSELF:
 International Caps Lock Day is in fact a testament to the small mindedness of certain Western individuals: the majority of the world’s population writes in scripts which have no concept of letter casing. Therefore it is advised to laugh at anyone who invokes this day as an excuse to dismiss local typographical conventions: they are simply making an ass out of themselves.
THE FICTIONAL HOLIDAY HAS GROWN TO THE POINT WHERE IT NOW HAS ITS OWN “OFFICIAL” WEBSITE, A PORTAL THAT IS THE “SELF PROCLAIMED OFFICIAL HOME PAGE OF CAPS LOCK DAY” AND ALSO HAS A DEDICATED TWITTER ACCOUNT TO GO WITH IT.

INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY IS SO POPULAR, IT IS CELEBRATED TWICE A YEAR. THE HOLIDAY IS ALSO CELEBRATED ON THE 28TH JUNE, COINCIDING WITH THE DAY THAT BILLY MAYS DIED IN 2009, SO THAT THE INTERNET CAN HONOR THE “INFOMERCIAL KING” BY TYPING LIKE THE VERY FIRST INTERNET USER.

OCTOBER 22 IS SEEN AS THE MORE SIGNIFICANT OF THE TWO HOWEVER.

A WORD OF WARNING. USE YOUR CAPS LOCK SPARINGLY. ONCE IS FUNNY, TWICE MIGHT GET A SMIRK, ANY MORE AND YOU ARE LOOKING FOR THE INTERNET EQUIVALENT OF A PUNCH IN THE FACE.

Insurance Awareness Day


Insurance Awareness Day is celebrated on June 28th of each year. The staff at National Whatever Day were unable to discover the origin of Insurance Awareness Day. However, we believe it was established as a way to share the importance of being insured in case of an emergency.

Insurance is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. Insurance is defined as the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another, in exchange for payment. An insurer is a company selling the insurance; the insured, or policyholder, is the person or entity buying the insurance policy. The amount to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage is called the premium. Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice.

The transaction involves the insured assuming a guaranteed and known relatively small loss in the form of payment to the insurer in exchange for the insurer’s promise to compensate (indemnify) the insured in the case of a financial (personal) loss. The insured receives a contract, called the insurance policy, which details the conditions and circumstances under which the insured will be financially compensated.

Insurance involves pooling funds from many insured entities (known as exposures) to pay for the losses that some may incur. The insured entities are therefore protected from risk for a fee, with the fee being dependent upon the frequency and severity of the event occurring. In order to be insurable, the risk insured against must meet certain characteristics in order to be an insurable risk. Insurance is a commercial enterprise and a major part of the financial services industry, but individual entities can also self-insure through saving money for possible future losses.

National Log Cabin Day


National Log Cabin Day brings you back to a quieter, simpler, more rugged era. A couple hundred years ago, life was far more rugged. Americans moving West (west at the time may have been Ohio, or Tennessee) found an untouched wilderness, filled with pristine forests. They built their homes out of logs. These log cabins were solid, long lasting, and served them well.

Life was rustic and simple. Heat was provided by an open fireplace, where they also cooked their meals. Need air conditioning in the summer? Just open the window (there wasn't any glass or screening). There was no electricity (no television, stereos or boom boxes blasting, or computers). And, plumbing? Just look back towards the woods to the outhouse. The path to it is well worn.

National Log Cabin Day celebrates what was then the "Modern" home in America, and all of the lifestyle that accompanied it. Today is a day to appreciate the history and significance of log cabins. Visit them at historical museums today, or sometime this summer.

The Log Cabin Society, founded by Virginia Handy, and the Bad Axe Historical Society,  in Michigan created the annual Log Cabin Day on June 25, 1986. Their objectives included promoting the preservation of Log Cabins, and awareness and education of life during the era in America when log cabins were common.

National Tapioca Day


National Tapioca Day is an informal food holiday celebrated on June 28. National Tapioca Day is one of the many food holidays that do not have a clear, recognized origin, even though they appear in blog posts and food holiday lists online. There is no clear endorsement or announcement of National Tapioca Day by a retailer or manufacturer of tapioca, or by a government official.

Tapioca is a starch that comes from the root of the cassava plant, Manihot esculenta. This starch has many uses, not all of them for food. Due to its properties, tapioca starch has applications as an ingredient for glues and other products. Tapioca starch is also used in manufacturing processes, such as in the manufacture of alcohol, beverages, paper, confectionery, textiles, and other products.

Tapioca is gluten free, and contains almost no protein. As a food or ingredient, tapioca can take many different forms. When used in cooking, tapioca starch or tapioca flour can serve as a thickener or gelling agent, as a stabilizer, or to create the body of a glazy jelly for sweet pie fillings. It is a popular product for uses such as these due to its ability to withstand heat, cold, and even freezing.

As well as a flour, tapioca is also processed into other forms, such as flakes, small rectangular sticks, or round granules known as pearl tapioca. Pearl tapioca is also sometimes called tapioca seed, even though this is not an accurate description of what the pearls of tapioca are.

Pearl tapioca is the form seen in tapioca pudding and other desserts featuring the familiar round, soft bubbles. Some recipes which use pearl tapioca have the word sago in their name, even though sago is a different product from a different plant. This is probably because in many cases, recipes originally using sago balls now replace them with the very similar tapioca pearls. Pearl tapioca is also the form seen in bubble tea.

One of the earliest references to a concept of a special day for tapioca seems to be an episode of the animated cartoon series Garfield and Friends. An episode of the show from 1988 included a short gag entitled National Tapioca Pudding Day.

Sources mentioning National Tapioca Day do not give any official origin or reason for the existence of this food holiday.

Tapioca starch has been used in Western countries for many years, at least since World War II. Tapioca has been used in other places for much longer, although it is not clear exactly how much longer.

National Tapioca Day is celebrated only by those who are interested in special food holidays, or those who use food holidays as writing topics or party themes.

There are many enjoyable ways to celebrate National Tapioca Day, due to the sheer number of applications of tapioca. A great variety of exotic-looking desserts can be made from tapioca, and they have the added bonus of interesting textures due to different forms and shapes that tapioca is sold in.

You could also make and share some homemade bubble tea for the occasion, or go out to enjoy bubble tea or tapioca desserts at a restaurant, cafe, or bubble tea outlet. Look out for bubble tea coupons, deals, or special offers that may be promoted in connection with the holiday.

Paul Bunyan Day


Paul Bunyan Day is celebrated to remember and commemorate a giant American legend. This mythological lumberman is manifested, in the stories, to have been very adept. He accomplished several feats, for instance the organization of logging in the US and the training of carpenter ants to help loggers.

Paul Bunyan day is a US Folktale celebration. It is commemorated on different days in different parts of the U.S. Mostly it is observed in 27-28th of June every year.

The legend of Paul Bunyan begin with tales told by men in lumber camps, in 1800's and was considered to have initiated among French Canadians in the time of the Papineau rebellion of 1837.

Paul Bunyan transformed into a legend as stories of this giant lumberjack who had to his credit incredible feats spread. Some of these stories are: he scooped out the big lakes for his blue ox, Babe; he cleared the lands of North and South Dakota to make it feasible for farming; he taught ants to perform logging work; and he had also been instrumental in creating logging in the U.S.

If the averments in the book “Paul Bunyan” of writer James Stevens is to be believed, which published in 1925, French Canadians conceptualized the tales during the Papineau Rebellion of 1837, when they rose against the young English Queen.

Later historians believed that Paul Bunyan, and particularly the idea of Bunyan as a giant lumberman coupled with a giant blue ox sidekick, was generated in the 20th century for a marketing campaign. Nonetheless there is no substantial evidence is available to support this myth.

Bunyan's birth was quite strange, as are the births of several legendaries, as it required five storks to carry the kid. When after some time he clapped and laughed, the vibration broke every window in the house. At the age of seven months, he sawed the legs off his parents' bed at night. Paul and Babe the Blue Ox dug the Grand Canyon when he carried his axe behind him. He formed Mount Hood by accumulating rocks on top of his campfire to put it out.

Babe the Blue Ox, Bunyan's mate, was a huge creature with extraordinary strength. Most myths of Bunyan manifest Babe the Blue Ox as being of massive size compared to everything else. Among other stories, a myth about the creation of huge lakes was also a tale in which Paul Bunyan required to make a watering hole sufficient enough for Babe to drink from. There are also tales narrating that the 10,000 Lakes of Minnesota were created from the footprints of Paul and Babe while they wandered endlessly in massive snowstorm.

Tau Day


One of the major contributions Archimedes made to mathematics was his method for approximating the value of Pi, the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. There is now an online movement to celebrate Tau, the number you get when you use a circle's radius instead. Tau is approximately 6.28, instead of the familiar constant Pi, which is 3.14. There is much opinion and controversy surrounding this new movement. Nevertheless, Tau Day is celebrated on June 28. Here are some Tau resources for you to explore.

There aren't many things that Congress can agree on, but in early 2009 it passed a bipartisan resolution designating March 14th of each year as "Pi Day." Pi, the mathematical constant that students first encounter with the geometry of circles, equals about 3.14, hence its celebration on March 14. The math holiday had been a staple of geeks and teachers for years—festivities include eating pie the pastry while talking about pi the number—but dissent began to appear from an unexpected quarter: a vocal and growing minority of mathematicians who rally around the radical proposition that pi is wrong.

They don't mean anything has been miscalculated. Pi (π) still equals the same infinite string of never-repeating digits. Rather, according to The Tau Manifesto, "pi is a confusing and unnatural choice for the circle constant." Far more relevant, according to the algebraic apostates, is 2π, aka tau.

Manifesto author Michael Hartl received his PhD in theoretical physics from the California Institute of Technology and is only one in a string of established players beginning to question the orthodoxy. Last year the University of Oxford hosted a daylong conference titled "Tau versus Pi: Fixing a 250-Year-Old Mistake." In 2012 the Massachusetts Institute of Technology modified its practice of letting applicants know admissions decisions on Pi Day by further specifying that it will happen at tau time—that is, at 6:28 P.M. The Internet glommed onto the topic as well, with its traditional fervor for whimsical causes. YouTube videos on the subject abound with millions of views and feisty comment sections—hardly a common occurrence in mathematical debates.

The crux of the argument is that pi is a ratio comparing a circle’s circumference with its diameter, which is not a quantity mathematicians generally care about. In fact, almost every mathematical equation about circles is written in terms of r for radius. Tau is precisely the number that connects a circumference to that quantity.

But usage of pi extends far beyond the geometry of circles. Critical mathematical applications such as Fourier transforms, Riemann zeta functions, Gaussian distributions, roots of unity, integrating over polar coordinates and pretty much anything involving trigonometry employs pi. And throughout these diverse mathematical areas the constant π is preceded by the number 2 more often than not. Tauists (yes, they call themselves tauists) have compiled exhaustively long lists of equations—both common and esoteric, in both mathematics and physics—with 2π holding a central place. If 2π is the perennial theme, the almost magically recurring number across myriad branches of mathematics, shouldn’t that be the fundamental constant we name and celebrate?

If that’s all there was, the tau movement would likely be a curiosity and nothing more. But reasons for switching to tau are deeply rooted in pedagogy as well. University of Utah mathematics professor Robert Palais, who is considered the founding father of the movement, started the "pi is wrong" ruckus with an article of the same name in 2001[pdf]. The article, which should be required reading for all advanced high school students, creates a tantalizing picture of how much easier certain fundamental concepts of trigonometry could be in an alternate universe where we use tau. For example, with pi-based thinking, if you want to designate a point one third of the way around the circle, you say it has gone two thirds pi radians. Three quarters around the same circle has gone one and a half pi radians. Everything is distorted by a confusing factor of two. By contrast, a third of a circle is a third of tau. Three quarters of a circle is three quarters tau. As a result of pi, Palais says, "the opportunity to impress students with a beautiful and natural simplification is turned into an absurd exercise in memorization and dogma."

At its heart, pi refers to a semicircle, whereas tau refers to the circle in its entirety. Mathematician and poet Mike Keith once wrote a 10,000 word poem dedicated to the first 10,000 digits of pi. He is now a proponent of tau. According to a PBS article from last year, he said that thinking in terms of pi is like reaching your destination and saying you're twice halfway there.