Saturday, July 18, 2015

Holidays and Observances for July 18 2015

National Caviar Day


National Caviar Day is celebrated on July 18th of each year. We were unable to discover the origin of National Caviar Day.

Caviar, sometimes called black caviar, is a luxury delicacy, consisting of processed, salted, non-fertilized sturgeon roe. The roe can be “fresh” (non-pasteurized) or pasteurized, the latter having much less culinary and economic value.

Traditionally the designation caviar is only used for sturgeon roe from the wild sturgeon species living in the Caspian and Black Sea (Beluga, Ossetra and Sevruga caviars). These caviar varieties, according to their quality (based on flavor, size, consistency and color) can reach (February 2009) prices between € 6,000 and € 12,000 per kilo, and are associated with gourmet and Haute cuisine environments.

Depending on specific national laws, the name caviar may also be used to describe the roe of other fish such as salmon, steelhead, trout, lumpfish, whitefish, and other species of sturgeon. The term is also used to describe dishes that are perceived to resemble caviar, such as “eggplant caviar” (made from eggplant / aubergine) and “Texas caviar” (made from black-eyed peas).

According to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, roe from any fish not belonging to the Acipenseriformes species (including Acipenseridae, or sturgeon stricto sensu, and Polyodontidae or paddlefish) are not caviar, but “substitutes of caviar”. This position is also adopted by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, the World Wide Fund for Nature, the United States Customs Service, and the Republic of France.

Caviar is commercially marketed worldwide as a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread; for example, with hors d’Ĺ“uvres

National Woodie Wagon Day


With nostalgic thoughts of yesteryear, family vacations and surfing, we celebrate National Woodie Wagon Day. This iconic style for vehicles grew in popularity during the 1940s. Steel was being salvaged for the war effort, so car manufacturers turned to wood as a replacement. Placed along the sides of the "wagon", the Woodie was seen carrying families throughout the 40s and 50s. As the cars' popularity subsided and prices dropped, California surfers began picking up these inexpensive modes of transportation that could easily carry their boards. The Woodie revival was subsequently born - and now the car's legend continues to live on.

A Woodie is a car body style with rear bodywork constructed of wood framework with infill wood panels. Originally, wood framework augmented the car's structure, where later models featured applied wood and wood-like elements.

Ultimately, manufacturers supplanted wood construction with a variety of materials and methods to recall wood construction — including infill metal panels, metal framework, or simulated wood-grain sheet vinyl, sometimes augmented with three-dimensional, simulated framework. In 2008, wood construction was evoked abstractly on the Ford Flex with a series of side and rear horizontal grooves.

Nelson Mandela International Day


Nelson Mandela International Day, also known as Mandela Day, is held on July 18 each year. The day remembers Mandela’s achievements in working towards conflict resolution, democracy, human rights, peace, and reconciliation.

Nelson Mandela Day not only celebrates Nelson Mandela’s life, but it is also a global call to action for people to recognize their ability to have a positive effect on others around them. The day hopes to inspire people to embrace the values that Mandela shared. These values include democracy, freedom, equality, diversity, reconciliation, and respect.

Many people and organizations around the world take part in many activities to promote Nelson Mandela Day. These activities include volunteering, sport, art, education, music and culture. Various events are also held on or around July 18 to honor Nelson Mandela’s works and to promote the different projects that were inspired by Mandela’s achievements.

Mandela Day also celebrates a campaign known as “46664”, in reference to Nelson Mandela’s Robben Island prison number. The campaign was originally launched to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS. However, its focus expanded to broader humanitarian work. The efforts from Mandela Day support the campaign’s ongoing work and other Nelson Mandela charitable organizations.

Nelson Mandela was born in Transkei, South Africa, on July 18, 1918. He is one of the most well-known anti-apartheid activists in South Africa. He was jailed in 1964 for leading the liberation movement against apartheid and for his stance on the human right to live in freedom.

Mandela’s prisoner number was 466 and the year was 1964 when he was imprisoned on Robben Island, off Cape Town in South Africa. The Robben Island prisoners were never referred to by their names, but rather by their numbers and year of imprisonment – hence 46664 was Nelson Mandela’s number. His release from prison in 1990 fed political debates in the country and contributed to South Africa’s transition towards a multi-racial democracy.

After his release, Nelson Mandela continued addressing racial issues in his country and supported reconciliation initiatives. His efforts resulted in him becoming elected as South Africa’s president in 1994. He remained in office as president until 1999. He also won the Nobel Peace Prize, together with another former South African president Frederik Willem de Klerk, in 1993. In 2007 Mandela formed the Elders, an independent group of global leaders who offer their influence and experience to support peace building, help address major human suffering causes and promote shared interests of humanity.

The first Mandela Day was launched in New York on July 18, 2009, but the UN’s resolution to declare the day occurred later that year. On November 10, 2009, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution declaring July 18 as “Nelson Mandela International Day”. The day marks Nelson Mandela’s contribution to peace through his active involvement in resolving conflicts, promoting human rights, international democracy and reconciliation, and in addressing racial issues.

Various statues and civic tributes have been made to honor Nelson Mandela. For example, a statue in Mandela’s image stands at Nelson Mandela Square in Johannesburg, South Africa. A bridge, known as the Nelson Mandela Bridge, is also found in Johannesburg. Postage stamps have also been dedicated to Mandela, as well as various musical tributes, in previous times.

Toss Away the "Could Haves" and "Should Haves" Day


Get out your pen and paper, today is the day that you move on from the past and propel yourself into the future. Started by Martha J. Ross-Rodgers, motivational speaker and author, Toss Away the “Could Haves” and “Should Haves” Day was created to help people distance themselves from being controlled by the past.

The first step to letting go of the past is recognizing that it is simply that, the past. You cannot change what has happened in the past, but you can change how you act and react in the present. Realigning your focus to the present will stop you from fixating on the past and liberate you from allowing the past to affect your future.

Second, you have to accept the fact that life is not linear. You may experience the highest highs only to be thrown into the lowest lows, but you have to face obstacles head on and work through them. The moments that you remember as your “could haves” and “should haves” can help you to learn a lot about yourself, and it is important to reflect on why you have held on to those moments before letting them go.

It is time to write down your personal “could haves” and “should haves”. Make a list of all the things that have nagged at you, the what-ifs and the regrets, and throw it out. After you throw your list in the trash, the final step is to make the resolution, “From this day forward, I choose not to live in the past—the past is history that I can’t change. I can do something about the present—I choose to live in the present.”