Sunday, August 23, 2015

Holidays and Observances for August 23 2015

Buttered Corn Day


August 23rd means it's Buttered Corn Day and I don't know about you but I could make a pig of myself with buttered sweet corn. Especially if it's cooked on the grill. Even if it's not, just give me a bowl of hot corn and melted butter with a big fat spoon and I'm happy.

I was reading about the Health benefits of corn and Wikipedia says "Cooked sweet corn has significant antioxidant activity, which can substantially reduce the chance of heart disease and cancer. " Cooked sweet corn retains its antioxidant activity, The scientists measured the antioxidants' ability to quench free radicals, which cause damage to the body from oxidation. Cooked sweet corn also releases increased levels of ferulic acid, which provides health benefits, such as battling cancer. "When you cook it, you release it, and what you are losing in vitamin C, you are gaining in ferulic acid and total antioxidant activity.""

Nice health benefits! So let's eat more corn!

European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism


The European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism, known as the Black Ribbon Day in some countries, which is observed on 23 August, is the international remembrance day for victims of totalitarian ideologies, specifically communism/Stalinism, fascism and Nazism.

It was designated by the European Parliament in 2008/2009 as "a Europe-wide Day of Remembrance for the victims of all totalitarian and authoritarian regimes, to be commemorated with dignity and impartiality," and has been observed annually by the bodies of the European Union since 2009. The European Parliament's 2009 resolution on European conscience and totalitarianism, co-sponsored by the European People's Party, the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe, The Greens–European Free Alliance, and the Union for Europe of the Nations, called for its implementation in all of Europe. The establishment of 23 August as an international remembrance day for victims of totalitarianism was also supported by the 2009 Vilnius Declaration of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly.

23 August was chosen to coincide with the date of the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in which the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany agreed to divide eastern Europe between themselves, an event described by the European Parliament's president Jerzy Buzek in 2010 as "the collusion of the two worst forms of totalitarianism in the history of humanity." The remembrance day originated in protests held in western cities against Soviet crimes and occupation in the 1980s, initiated by Canadian refugees from countries occupied by the Soviet Union, and that culminated in The Baltic Way, a major demonstration during the Revolutions of 1989 that contributed to the liberation of the Baltic states.

The purpose of the Day of Remembrance is to preserve the memory of the victims of mass deportations and exterminations, while promoting democratic values with the aim of reinforcing peace and stability in Europe.

23 August is also officially recognised by Canada and the United States, where it is known as Black Ribbon Day.

Both the date of 23 August as a remembrance day and the name "Black Ribbon Day" originated in demonstrations held in western countries in the 1980s, organised mostly by refugees from countries occupied by the Soviet Union, to bring attention to Soviet crimes and human rights violations, and to protest against the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact in which Hitler gave Joseph Stalin free hands to invade several Eastern European nations as well as subsequent deals such as the Yalta Conference in which Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt gave Joseph Stalin free hands in Eastern Europe, including to annex states occupied by the Soviet Union and impose a totalitarian dictatorship on them that lasted for decades. On 23 August 1986, Black Ribbon Day demonstrations were held in 21 western cities including New York City, Ottawa, London, Stockholm, Seattle, Los Angeles, Perth, Australia and Washington DC. The demonstrations were initiated by Canada’s Central and Eastern European communities.

In 1987, Black Ribbon Day protests spread to the Baltic countries, culminating in the Baltic Way in 1989, a historic event during the revolutions of 1989, in which two million people joined their hands to form a human chain, to protest against the continued Soviet occupation.

Go Topless Day


The annual event, also referred to as Go Topless Day, National Go Topless Day and/or International Go Topless Day, is observed on the Sunday closest to Women's Equality Day, an annual holiday that commemorates the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave women the right to vote.

Rael, the spiritual leader of the Raelian Movement and founder of GoTopless.org, founded the annual “holiday” back in 2007 to help raise awareness about breast inequality. According to the Rael,

"As long as men are allowed to be topless in public, women should have the same constitutional right. Or else, men should have to wear something to hide their chests."

In honor of Go Topless Day, men and women around the globe will take part in various topless rallies, protests and marches to show their "support" for women's rights to go bare up there in public. Folks in Paris, Vancouver, Toronto, London, Amsterdam, Geneva, Tel Aviv and 30 cities across America are expected to attend this year's event. Please visit the "BoobMap" for information on an event near you.

If you need to get something off your chest, show your "support" for breast equality by participating in Go Topless Day!

Hug Your Sweetheart Day


On 23rd August, every year we celebrate Hug Your Sweetheart Day.

This is the perfect day on which you can express your love and affection to your dear beloved and let him or her know that he or she have a very special place in your heart, even his or her thought bring a sweet smile on your face and his or her presences makes real big differences in your life and makes each day more and more beautiful.

This is the day you get a chance to say each and every word through which you can  express your heart out in the best way possible.

Therefore go to your sweetheart and give her or him a tightest hug possible in your arms to completely show your true love towards him or her.

One can also send some romantic messages and greetings E-cards to make your sweetheart feel that he or she is really special for you.

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition


The United Nations’ (UN) International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition is annually observed on August 23 to remind people of the tragedy of the transatlantic slave trade. It gives people a chance to think about the historic causes, the methods and the consequences of slave trade.

Each year the UN invites people all over the world, including educators, students and artists, to organize events that center on the theme of this day. Theatre companies, cultural organizations, musicians and artists take part on this day by expressing their resistance against slavery through performances that involve music, dance and drama.

Educators promote the day by informing people about the historical events associated with slave trade, the consequences of slave trade, and to promote tolerance and human rights. Many organizations, including youth associations, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations, actively take part in the event to educate society about the negative consequences of slave trade.

In late August, 1791, an uprising began in Santo Domingo (today Haiti and the Dominican Republic) that would have a major effect on abolishing the transatlantic slave trade. The slave rebellion in the area weakened the Caribbean colonial system, sparking an uprising that led to abolishing slavery and giving the island its independence. It marked the beginning of the destruction of the slavery system, the slave trade and colonialism.

International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition was first celebrated in many countries, in particular in Haiti, on August 23, 1998, and in Senegal on August 23, 1999. Each year the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) reminds the international community about the importance of commemorating this day. This date also pays tribute to those who worked hard to abolish slave trade and slavery throughout the world. This commitment and the actions used to fight against the system of slavery had an impact on the human rights movement.

UNESCO’s logo features a drawing of a temple with the “UNESCO” acronym under the roof of the temple and on top of the temple’s foundation. Underneath the temple are the words “United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization”. This logo is often used in promotional material for the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition.

National Sponge Cake Day


Today is National Sponge Cake Day! Sponge cake is the perfect dessert to enjoy at the end of a warm summer day. It is light and fluffy and has just enough sweetness to cleanse the palette after a meal.

Sponge cake is a cake based on flour (usually wheat flour), sugar, and eggs, and is sometimes leavened with baking powder. It has a firm, yet well aerated structure, similar to a sea sponge. A sponge cake may be produced by the batter method or the foam method.

Cake made using the batter method is known as a butter or pound cake in the U.S., while in the U.K. it is known as Madeira cake or Victoria sponge cake. A cake made using the foam method is known as a sponge cake or, in the U.K., also as whisked sponge. These forms of cake are common in Europe, especially in Frenchpatisserie.

The sponge cake is thought to be one of the first of the non-yeasted cakes, and the earliest attested sponge cake recipe in English is found in the 1615 book of English poet and author Gervase Markham, The English Huswife, Containing the Inward and Outward Virtues Which Ought to Be in a Complete Woman. Though it does not appear in Hannah Glasse's The Art of Cookery in the late 18th century, it is found in Lydia Maria Child's The American Frugal Housewife, indicating that sponge cakes had been established in Grenada in the Caribbean, by the early 19th century.

Variations on the theme of a cake lifted, partially or wholly, by trapped air in the batter exist in most places where European patisserie has spread, including the Italian Génoise, the Portuguese pão-de-ló, the Anglo-Jewish "plava", and the possibly ancestral Italian pan di Spagna ("Spanish bread").

Derivatives of the basic sponge cake idea include the American chiffon cake and the Latin American Tres leches cake.

To celebrate National Sponge Cake Day, bake a homemade sponge cake to share with friends and family, or buy one from your local bakery! Enjoy!

National Ride the Wind Day


National Ride the Wind Day takes place on August 23. It is the anniversary of the first human powered flight to win the Kremer prize. The Kremer prizes are a series of monetary awards, that are given to pioneers of human-powered flight. The first Kremer prize was won on August 23, 1977 by Dr. Paul MacCready when his Gossamer Condor was the first human-powered aircraft to fly a figure eight around two markers one half mile apart, starting and ending the course at least 10 feet (3.0 m) above the ground.

Wind is the flow of gases on a large scale. On the surface of the Earth, wind consists of the bulk movement of air. Wind figures prominently in several popular sports, including recreational hang gliding, hot air ballooning, kite flying, snowkiting, kite landboarding, kite surfing, paragliding, sailing, and windsurfing. In gliding, wind gradients just above the surface affect the takeoff and landing phases of flight of a glider.

For aerodynamic aircraft which operate relative to the air, winds affect groundspeed, and in the case of lighter-than-air vehicles, wind may play a significant or solitary role in their movement and ground track.

Valentino Day


Valentino Day commemorates the death of Rudolph Valentino (or Rudolfo Alfonzo Raffaelo Piero Filibert Guglielmi De Valentina D’Antonguolla), 1920′s film star of The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, The Sheik, Blood and Sand, The Eagle and Son of the Sheik.

The death of silent-screen idol Rudolph Valentino at the age of 31 sends his fans into a hysterical state of mass mourning. In his brief film career, the Italian-born actor established a reputation as the archetypal screen lover. After his death from a ruptured ulcer was announced, dozens of suicide attempts were reported, and the actress Pola Negri--Valentino's most recent lover--was said to be inconsolable. Tens of thousands of people paid tribute at his open coffin in New York City, and 100,000 mourners lined the streets outside the church where funeral services were held. Valentino's body then traveled by train to Hollywood, where he was laid to rest after another funeral.

Rudolph Valentino was born Rodolfo Guglielmi in Castellaneta, Italy, in 1895. He immigrated to the United States in 1913 and worked as a gardener, dishwasher, waiter, and gigolo before building a minor career as a vaudeville dancer. In 1917, he went to Hollywood and appeared as a dancer in the movie Alimony. Valentino became known to casting directors as a reliable Latin villain type, and he appeared in a series of small parts before winning a leading role in The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921). The film, which featured a memorable scene of Valentino dancing the tango, made the rakishly handsome Italian an overnight sensation. His popularity soared with romantic dramas such as The Sheik (1921), Blood and Sand (1922), and The Eagle (1925).

Valentino was Hollywood's first male sex symbol, and millions of female fans idolized him as the "Great Lover." His personal life was often stormy, and after two failed marriages he began dating the sexy Polish actress Pola Negri in 1926. Shortly after his final film, The Son of the Sheik, opened, in August 1926, he was hospitalized in New York because of a ruptured ulcer. Fans stood in a teary-eyed vigil outside Polyclinic Hospital for a week, but shortly after 12 p.m. on August 23 he succumbed to infection.

Valentino lay in state for several days at Frank E. Campbell's funeral home at Broadway and 66th St., and thousands of mourners rioted, smashed windows, and fought with police to get a glimpse of the deceased star. Standing guard by the coffin were four Fascists, allegedly sent by Italian leader Benito Mussolini but in fact hired by Frank Campbell's press agent. On August 30, a funeral was held at St. Malachy's Church on W. 49th St., and a number of Hollywood notables turned out, among them Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, and Gloria Swanson. Pola Negri appointed herself chief mourner and obligingly fainted for photographers several times between the train station and the chapel. She collapsed in a dead faint again beside Valentino's bier, where she had installed a massive flower arrangement that spelled out the word POLA.

Valentino's body was shipped to Hollywood, where another funeral was held for him at the Church of the Good Shepherd on September 14. He then was finally laid to rest in a crypt donated by his friend June Mathis in Hollywood Memorial Park. Each year on the anniversary of his death, a mysterious "Lady in Black" appeared at his tomb and left a single red rose. She was later joined by other, as many as a dozen, "Ladies in Black." The identity of the original Lady in Black is disputed, but the most convincing claimant is Ditra Flame, who said that Valentino visited her in the hospital when she was deathly ill at age 14, bringing her a red rose. Flame said she kept up her annual pilgrimage for three decades and then abandoned the practice when multiple imitators started showing up.